Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA)

PANNA (Pesticide Action Network North America) works to replace pesticide use with ecologically sound and socially just alternatives. As one of five autonomous PAN Regional Centers worldwide, we link local and international consumer, labor, health, environment and agriculture groups into an international citizens' action network. This network challenges the global proliferation of pesticides, defends basic rights to health and environmental quality, and works to ensure the transition to a just and viable society.

Releases by this organization

Newswire article
Thursday, April 30, 2009
Global Chemical Treaty Tests New US Leadership
Hundreds of government officials, industry groups, and public interest observers will gather next week in Geneva to assess global progress on phasing out a set of dangerous chemicals. Many are looking to the new U.S. Administration to demonstrate renewed leadership in international efforts to address these priority pollutants.
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Newswire article
Thursday, April 02, 2009
Arctic Tribal Leaders, Doctors, Parents and Advocates Call for New US Position on Pharmaceutical Uses of the Pesticide Lindane
In the US, lindane is a pesticide approved for use in children's lice shampoo, but not on pets or plants. In much of the rest of the world, including Mexico, all uses of lindane have been banned for years. Parents, health professionals, and Arctic communities - whose food and breast milk are contaminated with a chemical they don't use - are urging US officials to close this loophole.
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Newswire article
Wednesday, February 04, 2009
California Coalition Urges Obama Administration to Pull Controversial Moth off 'High-Risk' List
It turns out the controversial “Light Brown Apple Moth” isn’t such a significant threat to crops after all. In a letter delivered today to newly confirmed Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, a broad coalition of organic farmers, community groups and pesticide policy reform advocates called on Vilsack to immediately strip the tiny moth from USDA’s “high-risk pest” list.
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