Ellen Brown

Ellen Brown

Ellen Brown is an attorney and founder of the Public Banking Institute. She is the author of twelve books, including the best-selling Web of Debt, and her latest book, The Public Bank Solution, which explores successful public banking models historically and globally.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, May 17, 2011
What a Public Bank Could Mean for California
California is the eighth largest economy in the world, and it has a debt burden to match. The state has outstanding general obligation bonds and revenue bonds of $158 billion, largely incurred for building infrastructure. Over $7 billion of California’s annual budget goes to pay interest on the state’s debt.
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Wednesday, April 27, 2011
Cheney Was Right About One Thing: Deficits Don’t Matter
“Deficit terrorists” are gutting governments and forcing the privatization of public assets, all in the name of “deficit reduction.” But deficits aren’t actually a bad thing. In today’s monetary scheme, in which most money comes from debt, debt and deficits are actually necessary to have a stable money supply. The public debt is the people’s money.
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Monday, March 28, 2011
A Choice for States: Banks, Not Budget Crises
Cut spending, raise taxes, sell off public assets—these are the unsatisfactory solutions being debated across the nation, but the budget crises that nearly all the states are now suffering did not arise from too much spending or too little taxation.
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Monday, March 07, 2011
How Wisconsin Could Turn Austerity into Prosperity: Own a Bank
Public sector worker sitting in a bar: “They’re trying to take away our pensions.”
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Friday, October 29, 2010
Time for a New Theory of Money
The reason our financial system has routinely gotten into trouble, with periodic waves of depression like the one we’re battling now, may be due to a flawed perception not just of the roles of banking and credit but of the nature of money itself. In our economic adolescence, we have regarded money as a “thing”—something independent of the relationship it facilitates. But today there is no gold or silver backing our money.
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Friday, October 15, 2010
Foreclosuregate: Time to Break Up the Too-Big-to-Fail Banks?
Looming losses from the mortgage scandal dubbed "foreclosuregate" may qualify as the sort of systemic risk that, under the new financial reform bill, warrants the breakup of the too-big-to-fail banks. The Kanjorski amendment allows federal regulators to pre-emptively break up large financial institutions that-for any reason-pose a threat to U.S. financial or economic stability.
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Wednesday, August 18, 2010
Homeowners' Rebellion: Could 62 Million Homes Be Foreclosure-Proof?
Mortgages bundled into securities were a favorite investment of speculators at the height of the financial bubble leading up to the crash of 2008 . The securities changed hands frequently, and the companies profiting from mortgage payments were often not the same parties that negotiated the loans.
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Thursday, October 15, 2009
Reviving the Local Economy With Publicly Owned Banks
The credit crunch is getting worse on Main Street, despite a Wall Street bailout now in the trillions of dollars. The Federal Reserve's charts show that "base money" is rapidly expanding—meaning coins, paper money, and commercial banks' reserves with the central bank.
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Monday, June 15, 2009
Out of the Ashes of GM: the Phoenix of Renewable Energy
It may be prophetic that among the brands GM chose to kill was the Pontiac Firebird, a classic hot car of the 1960s sporting the fabled Phoenix on its hood. In mythology, the Phoenix was a colorful bird that incinerated itself in its nest, then rose from the ashes as its own offspring. GM too, says Michael Moore, could be reborn as something else. In a June 1 eulogy of sorts, he wrote :
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Thursday, April 09, 2009
Revive Lincoln’s Monetary Policy: an Open Letter to President Obama
Dear President Obama:
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