Jeremy Scahill

Jeremy Scahill is a journalist and author of the new book Dirty Wars: The World Is A Battlefield. His previous book was the New York Times bestseller Blackwater: The Rise of the World's Most Powerful Mercenary Army. He is currently a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at the Nation Institute.

Articles by this author

Views
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 8:26am
Perpetual War: How Does the Global War on Terror Ever End?
[ This epilogue to Scahill’s bestselling book, Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield , is posted with the kind permission of its publisher, Nation Books. ]
Read more
Views
Thursday, April 25, 2013 - 2:49pm
Inside America's Dirty Wars: The Killing of Anwar al-Awlaki and his Teenage Son
The following article is adapted from Dirty Wars: The World Is A Battlefield , just published by Nation Books.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:50pm
The Petraeus Legacy: A Paramilitary CIA?
While much of the media focus on l’affaire Petraeus has centered on the CIA director’s sexual relationship with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, the scandal opens a window onto a different and more consequential relationship—that between the CIA and the military’s Joint Special Operations Command.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, March 13, 2012 - 1:59pm
Why Is President Obama Keeping a Journalist in Prison in Yemen?
On February 2, 2011, President Obama called Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh. The two discussed counterterrorism cooperation and the battle against Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. At the end of the call, according to a White House read-out, Obama “expressed concern” over the release of a man named Abdulelah Haider Shaye, whom Obama said “had been sentenced to five years in prison for his association with AQAP.” It turned out that Shaye had not yet been released at the time of the call, but Saleh did have a pardon for him prepared and was ready to sign it.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 4:26pm
Washington's War in Yemen Backfires
Gen. Mohammed al-Sumali sits in the passenger seat of his armored Toyota Land Cruiser as it whizzes down the deserted highway connecting the Yemeni port city of Aden to Abyan province, where Islamist militants have overrun the provincial capital of Zinjibar. Sumali, a heavy-set man with glasses and a mustache, is the commander of the 25th Mechanized Brigade of the Yemeni armed forces and the man charged with cleansing Zinjibar of the militants.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 4:08pm
Blowback in Somalia
The notorious Somali paramilitary warlord who goes by the nom de guerre Indha Adde, or White Eyes, walks alongside trenches on the outskirts of Mogadishu’s Bakara Market once occupied by fighters from the Shabab, the Islamic militant group that has pledged allegiance to Al Qaeda. In one of the trenches, the foot of a corpse pokes out from a makeshift grave consisting of some sand dumped loosely over the body. One of Indha Adde’s militiamen says the body is that of a foreigner who fought alongside the Shabab.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 7:34pm
The CIA's Secret Sites in Somalia
Nestled in a back corner of Mogadishu’s Aden Adde International Airport is a sprawling walled compound run by the Central Intelligence Agency. Set on the coast of the Indian Ocean, the facility looks like a small gated community, with more than a dozen buildings behind large protective walls and secured by guard towers at each of its four corners. Adjacent to the compound are eight large metal hangars, and the CIA has its own aircraft at the airport.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, May 17, 2011 - 8:39am
Erik Prince, You're No Indiana Jones
When Erik Prince, founder of the infamous mercenary company Blackwater, claimed in early 2010 he was leaving the soldier of fortune business, he said he'd decided to pursue a less dangerous and controversial line of work. “I’m going to teach high school,” he said, straight-faced, in an interview with Vanity Fair. “History and economics. I may even coach wrestling. Hey, Indiana Jones taught school, too.” It was an interesting comment. As fans of Indiana Jones will recall, the whip-wielding archaeologist was indeed a professor.
Read more
Views
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:06pm
The Changing US Tune on Yemen
Over the weekend of April 2–3 in Yemen, the death toll of anti-government protesters continued to rise as security forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh reportedly shot dead twelve people and injured hundreds of others in the southern city of Taiz. Amid the violence, news broke late Sunday night that the Obama administration has quietly begun to withdraw its support for Saleh’s regime. Over the past two months of violence in Yemen, the United States has continued to back Saleh despite his violent response to widespread nonviolent protests against his regime.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, March 30, 2011 - 2:51pm
The Dangerous US Game in Yemen
The day before US missiles began raining down on Muammar el-Qaddafi’s Libya, hundreds of miles away—across the Red Sea—security forces under the control of Yemen’s US-backed president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, massacred more than fifty people who were participating in an overwhelmingly peaceful protest in the capital, Sana.
Read more

Pages