Environmental Leader Martin Litton Dies at 97

For Immediate Release

Contact: 

Mark Westlund, 415-977-5719; mark.westlund@sierraclub.org

Environmental Leader Martin Litton Dies at 97

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - Giant of the environmental movement and former Sierra Club board member Martin Litton died yesterday at 97 at his home in Palo Alto, CA. Litton served on the Sierra Club Board of Directors from 1964 to 1973, and was a recipient of the John Muir Award, the Sierra Club's highest honor, in 1993. Litton, over his more than fifty years of activism, was instrumental in preventing dams in the Grand Canyon and Dinosaur National Monument, in the establishment of Redwood National Park and Sequoia National Monument, and saw success on many other campaigns as well. His most recent environmental activities revolved around opposing logging in the Sequoia National Forest and the recently created Giant Sequoia National Monument, and campaigning to remove Glen Canyon Dam and drain Lake Powell.

In response, Sierra Club director Michael Brune issued the following statement:

"The American West has lost one of its great champions. Martin Litton was on the forefront of some of the most significant conservation victories over the last fifty years. He used his skills as a river runner, pilot, and photographer to expose threats to our wilderness and wild rivers and in the process helped save these national treasures for us all. His tenacious inability to surrender was an inspiration to the generations of environmental activists who followed in his wake." 

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The Sierra Club is the oldest and largest grassroots environmental organization in the United States. It was founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known conservationist and preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. The Sierra Club has hundreds of thousands of members in chapters located throughout the US, and is affiliated with Sierra Club Canada.

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