Donate Today!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 8, 2012
3:20 PM

CONTACT: National Priorities Project

Chris Hellman, Senior Research Analyst
413.584.9556, chellman@nationalpriorities.org

Talking About Military Spending and the Pentagon Budget

NORTHAMPTON, MA - February 8 - National Priorities Project and the Project on Defense Alternatives today released a new analysis of U.S. defense budgets -- past, present and future. Talking About Military Spending and the Pentagon Budget looks at many of the current issues relevant to the ongoing debate over the appropriate levels of U.S. military spending.

Last month Defense Secretary Leon Panetta offered a preview of the Pentagon's Fiscal Year 2013 budget request. The request for FY2013 is projected at $525 billion for the Pentagon's annual "base" budget, not including war costs and the nuclear weapons-related activities of the Department of Energy. Based on current Defense Department projections, the Pentagon needs to achieve a total of $487 billion in savings over the next decade.

"While this sounds like a lot of money, it really isn't. For example, based on DoD's calculations, they need to cut $259 billion over the next five years on their way to that $487 billion in savings. During that period the Pentagon will still spend over $2.7 trillion -- closer to $3 trillion when adjusted for inflation," notes NPP's Senior Research Analyst, Chris Hellman. 

The debate about what the appropriate levels of Pentagon spending are will be critical to this year's budget process. Talking About Military Spending will put you in the center of that discussion.

###
The National Priorities Project (NPP) is a 501(c)(3) research organization that analyzes and clarifies federal data so that people can understand and influence how their tax dollars are spent.  Located in Northampton, MA, since 1983, NPP focuses on the impact of federal spending and other policies at the national, state, congressional district and local levels.  For more information, go to http://nationalpriorities.org.


Comments are closed

1 Comment so far

Show All

Comments

Note: Disqus 2012 is best viewed on an up to date browser. Click here for information. Instructions for how to sign up to comment can be viewed here. Our Comment Policy can be viewed here. Please follow the guidelines. Note to Readers: Spam Filter May Capture Legitimate Comments...