News

Saturday, May 19, 2007
Indigenous Leaders Bring Eco-Sense to UN
UNITED NATIONS - If one is serious about addressing the climate change crisis, it might be wise to listen to those who have close and intimate knowledge of the lands and waters. "Mother Earth is crying," says Carrie Dann, an elder of the Western Shoshone indigenous people of the United States. "She...
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Washington's AIDS Hypocrites, Wolfowitz and Tobias, Ousted
The heads of two of the world's biggest AIDS programs, largely run by the United States, have resigned within a month of each other amid accusations of sexual hypocrisy. Paul Wolfowitz, the head of the World Bank, resigned yesterday after fighting for his job for six weeks. He was quoted Thursday...
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Jimmy Carter Slams Bush Administration
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — President George W. Bush's administration is "the worst in history" when it comes to international relations, former President Jimmy Carter said Friday, taking aim at the White House's policy of pre-emptive war and its Middle East diplomacy. The criticism from Carter, which a...
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Sarkozy Unveils his New 'Rainbow' Government
PARIS - President Nicolas Sarkozy has announced a centre-right government which includes seven women and France's first senior minister of Arab origin. M. Sarkozy's promised government of "openness" also included two leading ministers from the left and centre. During his long presidential campaign...
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Bush Resists Democrats on Military Pay
WASHINGTON - The White House is trying to kill a Democratic plan to increase the size of a military pay raise next year, contending it would be too costly and that members of the armed forces are already sufficiently compensated. In a letter from the White House Office of Management and Budget to...
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Friday, May 18, 2007
Obama Disputes Claim of Sharing Clinton's Stance on War
Senator Barack Obama yesterday directly challenged former President Bill Clinton's assertions that Mr. Obama and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton hold the same essential positions on the Iraq war. Throughout the spring, Mr. Clinton has privately told his wife's donors and supporters that it was...
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Earth's Natural Defenses against Climate Change 'Beginning to Fail'
The earth's ability to soak up the gases causing global warming is beginning to fail because of rising temperatures, in a long-feared sign of "positive feedback," new research reveals today. Climate change itself is weakening one of the principal "sinks" absorbing carbon dioxide - the Southern...
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Wolfowitz's Fall Brings More Bad News for Bush
The announcement by Paul Wolfowitz Thursday that he was stepping down soon as World Bank chief marked yet another blow for US President George W. Bush as his Republican administration nears its end. Wolfowitz, one of the key neoconservative engineers of the strategy that led the United States to...
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Halliburton Looks to Greener Pastures
WASHINGTON - As Halliburton held its annual meeting Wednesday in Houston, Texas, the Washington-based Corpwatch released its own "Alternative Annual Report" which details the alleged wrongdoings of the company and its former subsidiary, Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR), and questions the motivation...
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Minimum Wage Increase Likely to Remain Tied to War Bill
NEW YORK - A Congressional plan to give the United States' lowest-paid workers their first raise in nearly 10 years was put on hold earlier this month when U.S. President George W. Bush vetoed the Iraq War spending bill. A minimum wage clause appended to the war bill would have guaranteed all U.S...
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Study: Global Net Censorship 'Growing'
The level of state-led censorship of the net is growing around the world, a study of so-called internet filtering by the Open Net Initiative suggests. The study of thousands of websites across 120 Internet Service Providers found 25 of 41 countries surveyed showed evidence of content filtering...
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Kidnap and Torture: New Claims of UK Army War Crimes in Iraq
The British Army is facing new allegations that it was involved in "forced disappearances", hostage-taking and torture of Iraqi civilians after the fall of the regime of Saddam Hussein. One of the claims is made by the former chairman of the Red Crescent in Basra, who alleges he was beaten...
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Thursday, May 17, 2007
Detroit City Council votes to impeach Bush
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Greenpeace Builds Replica of Noah's Ark
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Environmental activists are building a replica of Noah's Ark on Mount Ararat , where the biblical vessel is said to have landed after the great flood , in an appeal for action on global warming, Greenpeace said Wednesday. Turkish and German volunteer carpenters are making the...
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Iraq: Send in the Clown
Jo Wilding's unembedded reports from Fallujah brought home the horror of the American assault on the city. But when she wasn't blogging, she was wearing stilts and trying to cheer up Iraq's traumatized children. She tells Emine Saner why she risked her life for total strangers. It is hard to...
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Teen Pregnancy Rates Lowest Yet, Study Finds
The rate of teen pregnancies in Canada has hit an all-time low and has fallen more dramatically than in the United States and England over the past three decades, according to new research. The findings suggest young women are better informed and have greater access to contraception than ever...
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Capitol Watchdogs Fret Over Rise in 'Honest Graft' Land Deals
WASHINGTON - A series of questionable land deals involving U.S. lawmakers have raised alarms among government watchdogs, who fear such dubious arrangements are on the rise. "Everyone's been trying to catch up to this phenomenon," said Keith Ashdown of Washington, D.C.-based Taxpayers for Common...
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Gas May Have Harmed Troops, Scientists Say
WASHINGTON - Scientists working with the Defense Department have found evidence that a low-level exposure to sarin nerve gas - the kind experienced by more than 100,000 American troops in the Persian Gulf war of 1991 - could have caused lasting brain deficits in former service members. Though the...
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Veterans Take Antiwar Call on Road
BOSTON - The Boston chapter of Iraq Veterans Against the War, formed this month in an Allston restaurant by a handful of former soldiers and Marines, is planning to take its call for immediate withdrawal from Iraq to all major military bases along the East Coast. The chapter is the 17th in a...
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Father of Christian Zionism Leaves the Building
OAKLAND, Calif. - The right-wing U.S. Christian evangelist Jerry Falwell, who died Tuesday at the age of 73, is perhaps best known for his fundamentalist social positions and tirades against lesbians, gays and feminists, not to mention "pagans", "abortionists" and assorted other miscreants.But...
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US Chided for Hindering International Efforts on Climate Change
UNITED NATIONS - Disappointed with the U.S. role in international discussions on energy, environmental groups are making fresh calls for Washington to give up its isolationist approach and become part of ongoing global efforts to tackle climate change. "It is time for the U.S. to acknowledge its...
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War-Torn Iraq 'Facing Collapse,' Says UK Think Tank
Iraq faces the distinct possibility of collapse and fragmentation, UK foreign policy think tank Chatham House says. Its report says the Iraqi government is now largely powerless and irrelevant in many parts of the country. It warns there is not one war but many local civil wars, and urges a major...
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Cluster Bombs Cause Decades of Harm, Says Study
Millions of people will be endangered by up to 132m cluster bomblets that have not yet exploded, causing lasting economic and social harm to communities in more than 20 countries for decades to come, a leading charity warned yesterday. Handicap International studied data from nine countries most...
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Wednesday, May 16, 2007
Senate Defeats Iraq Withdrawal Measure
WASHINGTON -- The Senate today handily defeated a measure to effectively end most U.S. combat operations in Iraq by next April, but the 29 senators who voted for the amendment represented the highest number yet that have united behind a proposal to force President Bush to bring home American troops...
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Baby 'Bubba' Issued Illinois Firearm Owner's Identification Card
CHICAGO -- Someday, Howard David Ludwig's Firearm Owner's Identification Card will be stored in a box with his first pair of shoes and perhaps a lock of his baby hair. That's because the card was issued when Howard, nicknamed Bubba, was just 10 months old. It lists his height (2 feet, 3 inches) and...
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CBS Fires Former Iraq Commander for Speaking Out Against Bush Policies in Iraq
NEW YORK - It took CBS two weeks to fire Don Imus for calling a college women's basketball team "nappy headed hos," but it only took them two days to fire Major General John Batiste for speaking out against the president and his policies on the war in Iraq. Groups critical of the war and President...
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Bolton: We Must Attack Iran Before it Gets the Bomb
WASHINGTON - Iran should be attacked before it develops nuclear weapons, America's former ambassador to the United Nations said yesterday. John Bolton, who still has close links to the Bush administration, told The Daily Telegraph that the European Union had to "get more serious" about Iran and...
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Feminist, Socialist, Devout Muslim: Woman Who Has Thrown Denmark into Turmoil
ODENSE, DENMARK - In the land that launched the cartoons war between Islam and the west, Asmaa Abdol-Hamid finds herself on the frontline, gearing up for a new battle. The 25-year-old social worker, student and town councillor describes herself as a feminist, a democrat, and a socialist. She has...
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Wolfowitz Scandal Spotlights US Reign at Bank
WASHINGTON - Recent White House backing for the beleaguered World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz, despite the findings of an internal report that said he had violated the Bank's ethics rules, is bringing the role of the United States in running the Bank in "undemocratic" ways under scrutiny, with...
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Children Face Exposure to Pesticides
STRATHMORE, Calif. - On Grandparents Day, Domitila Lemus accompanied her 8-year-old granddaughter to school. As the girls lined up behind Sunnyside Union Elementary, a foul mist drifted onto the playground from the adjacent orange groves, witnesses say. Lemus started coughing, and two children...
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Bono Warns G8 Backsliders
Bono last night called for an emergency session on Africa at next month's G8 summit in Germany as it emerged that rich countries are using the sympathy felt in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist attacks in London to justify their foot-dragging on meeting aid pledges made at Gleneagles two years ago...
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Panel Told of a Sickbed Face-Off
WASHINGTON - James B. Comey, then the acting U.S. attorney general, was on his way home one night in March 2004 when he got an urgent call from the office on his cellphone. The distraught wife of Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, who was recovering in the hospital from gallbladder surgery, had called the...
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Analysis Finds Large Antarctic Area Has Melted
While much of the world has warmed in a pattern that scientists have linked with near certainty to human activities, the frigid interior of Antarctica has resisted the trend. Now, a new satellite analysis shows that at least once in the last several years, masses of unusually warm air pushed to...
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Tuesday, May 15, 2007
Right-Wing Televangelist Jerry Falwell Dies
The Rev. Jerry Falwell, a pioneer among televangelists who later became a leading voice in the national debate over Christian values, has died at the age of 73. Falwell was found unconscious Tuesday in his office at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va. A fundamentalist preacher, Falwell burst onto...
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Boston Residents Face to Face with Bio-War
BOSTON, United States - The U.S. government and Boston University are facing protests and lawsuits for building a laboratory to research potential biological weapons in a neighborhood whose residents are mostly African-American and Latinos. Approved by the federal government in February 2006, the...
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CENTCOM Commander's Veto Sank Bush's Threatening Gulf Buildup
WASHINGTON - Admiral William Fallon, then President George W. Bush's nominee to head the Central Command (CENTCOM), expressed strong opposition in February to an administration plan to increase the number of carrier strike groups in the Persian Gulf from two to three and vowed privately there would...
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US Health System Ranks Last Compared to Other Countries: Studies
WASHINGTON - The US health care system ranks last among other major rich countries for quality, access and efficiency, according to two studies released Tuesday by a health care think tank. The studies by the Commonwealth Fund found that the United States, which has the most expensive health system...
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US Senate to Vote on Cutting off Iraq War Money
WASHINGTON - The US Senate is expected to vote as early as this week on whether to cut off money for the Iraq war next year, as well as on a softer measure calling for US troops to leave by October. Senate Democratic majority leader Harry Reid said today that the two measures would be offered as...
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Discrimination Against Girls 'Still Deeply Entrenched'
The report, “Because I am a Girl”, written by Plan International, includes statistics that make for grim reading:
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Son of Professor Opposed to War is Killed in Iraq
BOSTON - Boston University professor Andrew J. Bacevich has been a persistent, vocal critic of the Iraq war, calling the conflict a catastrophic failure. This week, the retired Army lieutenant colonel received the grim news that his son had been killed on patrol there. First Lieutenant Andrew J...
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Monday, May 14, 2007
Lobbying Reform Losing Steam in House
WASHINGTON - House Democrats are suddenly balking at the tough lobbying reforms they touted to voters last fall as a reason for putting them in charge of Congress. Now that they are running things, many Democrats want to keep the big campaign donations and lavish parties that lobbyists put together...
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Senators Who Weakened Drug Bill Got Millions from Industry
WASHINGTON - Senators who raised millions of dollars in campaign donations from pharmaceutical interests secured industry-friendly changes to a landmark drug-safety bill, according to public records and interviews. The bill, which passed 93-1, grants the Food and Drug Administration broad new...
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Shoe on the Other Foot as Africa Chides Wolfowitz
NAIROBI - The scandal hanging over World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz has damaged his ability to preach against corruption in Africa, but Africans say the bank's anti-graft message must remain whether he stays or goes. The bank is due to give its final decision on Tuesday on Wolfowitz's future,...
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'Honk for Peace' Case Tests Limits on Free Speech
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - When one of Deborah Mayer's elementary school students asked her on the eve of the Iraq war whether she would ever take part in a peace march, the veteran teacher recalls answering, "I honk for peace." Soon afterward, Mayer lost her job and her home in Indiana. She was out of...
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One Billion to be Displaced by 2050, Global Warming a Factor, Group Warns
LONDON - At least one billion people risk fleeing their homes over the next four decades because of conflicts and natural disasters that will worsen with global warming, a relief agency warned Monday. In a report, British-based Christian Aid said countries worldwide, especially the poorest, are now...
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Deforestation: The Hidden Cause of Global Warming
In the next 24 hours, deforestation will release as much CO2 into the atmosphere as 8 million people flying from London to New York. Stopping the loggers is the fastest and cheapest solution to climate change. So why are global leaders turning a blind eye to this crisis? The accelerating...
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US Trying to Weaken G-8 Climate Change Declaration
WASHINGTON -- Negotiators from the United States are trying to weaken the language of a climate change declaration set to be unveiled at next month's G-8 summit of the world's leading industrial powers, according to documents. A draft proposal dated April 2007 that is being debated in Bonn by...
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Common Chemicals are Linked to Breast Cancer
More than 200 chemicals - many found in urban air and everyday consumer products - cause breast cancer in animal tests, according to a compilation of scientific reports published today. Writing in a publication of the American Cancer Society, researchers concluded that reducing exposure to the...
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Sunday, May 13, 2007
Army Career Behind Him, General Speaks Out on Iraq
ROCHESTER, NY - John Batiste has traveled a long way in the last four years, from commanding the First Infantry Division in Iraq to quitting the Army after three decades in uniform and, now, from his new life overseeing a steel factory here, to openly challenging President Bush on his management of...
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Organic Milk Seen Flooding Market
After years of being in short supply, organic milk is expected to flood the U.S. market as a regulation change and higher margins push more dairy farmers to produce it. The dairy industry is expecting organic milk supply to surge by at least 40 percent this year from a previous annual growth rate...
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Ex-CIA Official Pushed Millions in Secret Deals to Pal, Prosecutors Say
A former top CIA official steered an aviation contracting opportunity worth $132 million to a longtime friend, despite his friend's lack of experience in the field, according to federal prosecutors. Onetime CIA Executive Director Kyle "Dusty" Foggo directed CIA employees to hire his childhood pal,...
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Bloodshed Rises in Iraq as US Demands 'Victory'
As Tony Blair, one of the architects of the Iraq war, prepares to leave office, it is clearer than ever that his ally's strategy of systematically crushing the Sunni insurgency is not working. In this special report from Baghdad, Patrick Cockburn shows why. It will be a long war. The rumble of...
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Iraqis Resist U.S. Pressure to Enact Oil Law
BAGHDAD - It has not even reached parliament, but the oil law that U.S. officials call vital to ending Iraq's civil war is in serious trouble among Iraqi lawmakers, many of whom see it as a sloppy document rushed forward to satisfy Washington's clock. Opposition ranges from vehement to measured,...
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Saturday, May 12, 2007
Can Capitalism Be Green?
TORONTO - Capitalism has proven to be environmentally and socially unsustainable, so future prosperity will have to come from a new economic model, say some experts. What this new model would look like is the subject of intense debate. One current theory states that continuous growth can be...
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Billions in Oil Missing in Iraq, US Study Says
Between 100,000 and 300,000 barrels a day of Iraq's declared oil production over the past four years is unaccounted for and could have been siphoned off through corruption or smuggling, according to a draft American government report. Using an average of $50 a barrel, the report said the...
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Iraq Funding Bill Too Oily
WASHINGTON - A new measure to fund the Iraq war has run into opposition from congressional Democrats who say it does not offer enough provisions to keep the United States away from Iraq's oil. "We have to be concerned that the oil in Iraq belongs to the Iraqi people," said Rep. Lynn Woolsey, D-...
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Migrating Birds' Habitat Threatened by Sea Wall
Thousands of birds are being starved on their migratory routes between Australia and Siberia as a result of a huge land-reclamation project that has drained a valuable wetland habitat in South Korea. A 20-mile-long sea wall has stopped the ebb and flow of the tides that have made the Saemangeum...
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Why Fearless Leaders are Something to Dread
LONDON - The painful unraveling over the last year of the public and private lives of one of the UK's most iconic businessmen, Lord Browne, is a sobering example of the pitfalls of the cult of leadership. Raising expectations far beyond the capacity of one human to fulfill them - neither BP's...
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Warming Triggers 'Alarming' Retreat of Himalayan Glaciers
KAROLA PASS, Tibet - The glaciers of the Himalayas store more ice than anywhere on Earth except for the polar regions and Alaska, and the steady flow of water from their melting icepacks fills seven of the mightiest rivers of Asia. Now, due to global warming and related changes in the monsoons and...
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Blair Faces Questions Over Alleged US Plan to Attack al-Jazeera
LONDON - The government is to be questioned in parliament next week over what discussions Tony Blair had with George Bush about plans to bomb the Arabic television satellite station al-Jazeera, at a particularly delicate time in the war in Iraq. Peter Kilfoyle, a former Labour defense minister, is...
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Friday, May 11, 2007
Moms Spend Their Weekend Protesting Iraq Occupation
SAN FRANCISCO - Antiwar activists from around the country will celebrate Mothers Day by converging on Washington, DC, where they will demand Congress end the U.S. occupation of Iraq. Five days of activism, sponsored by the women-for-peace group CODEPINK and "peace mom" Cindy Sheehan's Gold Star...
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Thailand Turns Giant Pharma Killer
BANGKOK - By standing up to pressure from big pharmaceutical companies over cheap anti-AIDS drugs, Thailand may have created an opening in global trade rules that will permit developing countries to more readily break patents in times of public health emergencies. The fact that the United States...
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Three US Newspapers Reverse 100-Year-Old Stand on Death Penalty
WASHINGTON - Three established U.S. newspapers, two of them among the 10 largest in the country, in three different states have in the past weeks abandoned their century-old support of the death penalty and become passionate advocates of a ban on state-sponsored killing. The newspapers -- the...
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Neo-Cons Driving Iran Divestment Campaign
WASHINGTON - Neo-conservative hawks who championed the invasion of Iraq are leading a new campaign to persuade state and local governments, as well as other institutional investors, to "divest" their holdings in foreign companies and U.S. overseas subsidiaries doing business in Iran. While...
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LEDs Emerge to Fight Fluorescents
The light bulb, the symbol of bright ideas, doesn't look like such a great idea anymore, as lawmakers in the U.S. and abroad are talking about banning the century-old technology because of its contribution to global warming. But what comes next? Compact fluorescent bulbs are the only real...
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New Hampshire Prosecutor Calls Protesters a 'Threat to the Public'
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Anti-war protesters, arrested for refusing to leave Sen. John H. Sununu's Manchester office, staged a "vainglorious event to gain publicity" and need to be held on some cash bail because the protest taxed police resources, causing a threat to the public, a police prosecutor said...
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Dissent in an Unlikely Place
LATROBE, PA. - President Bush could hardly have picked a better private liberal arts college to find a welcoming audience for a commencement address than St. Vincent, a Catholic school run by a loyal former White House aide in a conservative region. Yet consider what has taken place here since Bush...
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Climate Change Could Lead to Global Conflict, Says Beckett
LONDON - Climate change could spawn a new era of conflicts around the world over water and other scarce resources unless more is done to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the foreign secretary, Margaret Beckett, warned yesterday. She said climate-driven conflicts were already under way in Africa...
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Stifling Summers Forecast by NASA for US East Coast
NEW YORK - Researchers at NASA have warned that unless growth in greenhouse gas emissions can be successfully curbed, large areas of the eastern United States, from Washington DC to Florida, can expect to suffer through catastrophically hotter summers within just a couple of generations. A study...
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Thursday, May 10, 2007
Administration Withheld E-Mails About Rove
The Bush administration has withheld a series of e-mails from Congress showing that senior White House and Justice Department officials worked together to conceal the role of Karl Rove in installing Timothy Griffin, a protégé of Rove's, as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas. The...
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No Child Left Behind Scandal Widens
A scathing report issued today documents "substantial financial ties" between key advisors of Reading First, a controversial federal reading grant program, and publishers who benefited from the program. The report, issued by Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., chairman of the Senate Health, Education,...
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US-Afghanistan: Deaths Mount with No End in Sight
WASHINGTON - While attention among policy-makers in Washington remains focused on Iraq, the war in Afghanistan has become an ongoing struggle to keep the country from deteriorating into a failed state. Afghanistan remains one of the keystones in the United States' "war on terror". According to news...
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Michael Moore Faces US Treasury Probe
LOS ANGELES - Academy Award-winning filmmaker Michael Moore is under investigation by the U.S. Treasury Department for taking ailing Sept. 11 rescue workers to Cuba for a segment in his upcoming health-care documentary "Sicko," The Associated Press has learned. The investigation provides another...
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Marine Tells Hearing of Iraqi Civilians Shot Trying to Surrender
A Marine sergeant Wednesday admitted lying about the deaths of five Iraqi civilians who were killed while appearing to surrender during an alleged massacre by US troops two years ago. Sergeant Sanick Dela Cruz -- testifying after being given immunity from prosecution -- said the five Iraqi men were...
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US Lawmaker Asks Bush to Arrest Anti-Castro Bomb Suspect
WASHINGTON - A US lawmaker on Wednesday called on President George W. Bush to detain the Cuban anti-Castro militant Luis Posada Carriles, after a US judge freed the alleged airplane bomber. "The world will conclude that this administration has a double standard when it comes to fighting terrorism...
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Environment: Momentum Grows to 'Ban the Bulb'
WASHINGTON - On Feb. 20, Australia announced it would phase out the sale of inefficient incandescent light bulbs by 2010, replacing them with highly efficient compact fluorescent bulbs that use one-fourth as much electricity. If the rest of the world joins Australia in this simple step to sharply...
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Dismay over Nuclear 'Solution' to Climate Problem
UNITED NATIONS - The UN's experts on climate change are facing the wrath of many environmental groups this week for embracing the notion that additional use of nuclear power could be helpful in the fight against global warming. Last weekend, at the end of an international meeting held in Bangkok,...
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Global Public Favors Stronger United Nations
UNITED NATIONS - According to the results of a groundbreaking 18-nation poll released Wednesday, people around the world favor dramatic steps to strengthen the United Nations, including giving it the power to have its own standing peacekeeping force, to regulate the international arms trade and to...
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US Air Strikes Kill 21 Civilians in Afghanistan
At least 21 civilians, including six children, have been killed in US air strikes in Afghanistan, leading to angry protests among locals. The deaths brought the total of civilian deaths to almost 100 in the past two weeks and followed President Hamid Karzai's declaration that his people "can no...
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Wednesday, May 9, 2007
Retired US Army Colonel Speaks to Group; 'Hit the Streets'
A U.S. Army veteran who resigned in protest of the Bush administration's policies told her story to an appreciative crowd of nearly 70 in Eureka's Waterfront Wharfinger Building Monday night. "It is important that we hit the streets," retired Col. Ann Wright urged the group. "There are a lot of...
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US Greenhouse Gas Emissions Up
BONN, Germany - U.S. and Russian greenhouse gas emissions rose in 2005, more than canceling out a dip in the European Union's emissions despite growing calls to limit global warming, official data shows. Combined emissions by the United States, Russia and the EU, accounting for about half the world...
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White House Struggles To Fill Senior Posts
The Bush administration is facing growing difficulties in filling a rising number of high-level vacancies following a recent spate of senior departures. In the last 10 days alone Mr Bush has lost four senior officials and more resignations are expected to follow. "I wouldn't describe this as...
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Global Rush To Energy Crops Threatens To Bring Food Shortages and Increase Poverty, Says UN
The global rush to switch from oil to energy derived from plants will drive deforestation, push small farmers off the land and lead to serious food shortages and increased poverty unless carefully managed, says the most comprehensive survey yet completed of energy crops. The United Nations report,...
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Green Groups Dismayed As Flights Soar To Record High
Aviation growth is soaring to an all-time high, raising the prospect of a huge increase in the greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. For the first time, more than 2.5 million commercial flights will be made around the world in a single month, with 2.51 million scheduled for May, says...
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Pelosi's Next Tactic: Fund The War in Iraq 2 Months at a Time
WASHINGTON -- The confrontation between Congress and President Bush over the Iraq war will enter its next phase Thursday, when the House plans to vote on the Democratic leadership's new plan to put war spending on a strict, almost month-by-month diet. The White House indicated strongly Tuesday that...
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Pentagon Moved to Fix Iraqi Media Before Invasion
In the run-up to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Pentagon planned to create a 'Rapid Reaction Media Team' (RRMT) designed to ensure control over major Iraqi media while providing an Iraqi 'face' for its efforts, according to a 'White Paper' obtained by the independent National Security Archive...
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Tuesday, May 8, 2007
Deadly Dust: Study Suggests Cancer Risk from Depleted Uranium
Depleted uranium, which is used in armor-piercing ammunition, causes widespread damage to DNA which could lead to lung cancer, according to a study of the metal's effects on human lung cells. The study adds to growing evidence that DU causes health problems on battlefields long after hostilities...
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US Hospitals Charge Uninsured More, Study Says
U.S. hospitals are charging uninsured patients about two-and-a-half times more than those with health insurance, a mark-up that has been steadily rising despite pressure to level prices, a study released on Tuesday found.In 2004, the most recent year for which data was available, hospital patients...
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Protesters Favor Soft Hats, Tough Lyrics
They operate with a sense of outrage, a commitment to nonviolence, a love of song, and an irreverent brand of humor. Meet the Raging Grannies, feisty women of a certain age who protest war, nuclear power, bio hazards, degradation of the environment, and a panoply of other causes. They protest with...
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France's Election: Another Political Thatcher Is Born
PARIS - Nicolas Sarkozy's triumph in the French presidential elections could open the way for deep political and social changes, not unlike those that began with the era of Margaret Thatcher in Britain in the 1980s. At the same time, Sarkozy's triumph, or rather, the defeat of the Left in the shape...
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Population Policy: NGOs Warn of World Bank "Fundamentalists"
UNITED NATIONS - When the United States tried to water down a longstanding policy on reproductive health and family planning at the World Bank last month, there was a storm of protests from population experts and activist groups worldwide.The protests came from several non-governmental...
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Infant Mortality in Iraq Soars as Young Pay the Price for War
WASHINGTON -Two wars and a decade of sanctions have led to a huge rise in the mortality rate among young children in Iraq, leaving statistics that were once the envy of the Arab world now comparable with those of sub-Saharan Africa. A new report shows that in the years since 1990, Iraq has seen its...
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Unions Fire First Shots in Battle with France's Sarkozy
PARIS - Nicolas Sarkozy yesterday flew off for a three-day retreat in Malta to prepare for his French presidential takeover next week, while unions warned that any plans to force through sweeping reforms would face opposition. The rightwing former interior minister was handed a clear mandate for...
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New Fears Over Additives in Children's Food
Food safety experts have advised parents to eliminate a series of additives from their children's diet while they await the publication of a new study that is understood to link these ingredients to behaviour problems in youngsters. The latest scientific research into the effect of food additives...
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World Bank Panel Finds Wolfowitz at Fault; Aide Resigns
WASHINGTON - A committee of World Bank directors has formally notified Paul D. Wolfowitz that they found him to be guilty of a conflict of interest in arranging for a pay raise and promotion for Shaha Ali Riza, his companion, in 2005. The findings stepped up the pressure on Mr. Wolfowitz to resign...
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Monday, May 7, 2007
'The Other K Street'
WASHINGTON - Brad Woodhouse tapped the mute button on the gray speakerphone, scanned the faces of the half-dozen other people listening to the conference call and said with a sly grin, "Good spin." The spiky-haired Woodhouse had just heard a fellow member of Change America Now, a Democratic-leaning...
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Palestinians 'Routinely Tortured' in Israeli Jails
TEL AVIV - Palestinians detained by Israeli security forces are routinely tortured and ill-treated, according to a new report published by Israeli human rights groups yesterday. The ill-treatment, which includes beatings, sensory deprivation, back-bending, back-stretching and other forms of...
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Anti-Nuke Groups Gird for New Battle
WASHINGTON - Thirty years ago, they stormed the New Hampshire coast, arriving by foot and by boat, to be met by state police, National Guard troops and a governor roaming the site in army fatigues. By the time they slapped the cuffs on Paul Gunter and more than 1,400 others known collectively as...
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US Expects Rise in Troop Casualties
BAGHDAD - A U.S. Army general on Sunday warned that American casualties would rise in the coming months, a prediction underscored by the deaths of six soldiers and a foreign journalist in a roadside bombing north of Baghdad. Five other American troops died elsewhere over the weekend. Maj. Gen. Rick...
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Whistle-Blower on Student Aid Is Vindicated
WASHINGTON - When Jon Oberg, a Department of Education researcher, warned in 2003 that student lending companies were improperly collecting hundreds of millions in federal subsidies and suggested how to correct the problem, his supervisor told him to work on something else. The department "does not...
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