All Articles on El Salvador

Thousands of migrants, mostly from Honduras, are blocked from traveling further on a road by security forces in Vado Hondo, Guatemala on January 17, 2021. (Photo: Luis Vargas/Andalou Agency via Getty Images) News
As Guatemalan Forces Beat Back Migrant Caravan, Biden Urged to Reverse Trump Policies of 'Cruelty and Coercion'
"The answer is not to continue doing more of the same but to envision a new direction that respects the political and economic self-determination and dignity of our Central American neighbors."
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People gather to celebrate the victory of the referendum, in Santiago, Chile, on October 25, 2020 that will replace its 40-year-old constitution, written during the dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet, in Santiago, Chile. (Photo by Felipe Vargas Figueroa/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Views
Chile, Bolivia, El Salvador Lead On Decolonial Constitutional Change
Legalizing the world we need: social movements with constitutional visions.
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Montano (pictured above), who was jailed after his extradition, was part of "a structure outside the law that gravely altered the public peace with executions of civilians and forced disappearances." (Photo: Democracy Now/Creative Commons) News
Former US-Backed Salvadoran Colonel Sentenced by Spanish Court to 133 Years in Prison for 1989 Jesuit Massacre
Col. Inocente Orlando Montano led an elite U.S.-trained army unit that massacred six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and her teenage daughter during El Salvador's 12-year civil war.
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Montano (pictured above), who was jailed after his extradition, was part of "a structure outside the law that gravely altered the public peace with executions of civilians and forced disappearances." (Photo: Democracy Now/Creative Commons) Views
Spain: Trial Begins for Former Salvadoran Colonel Accused of ’89 Jesuit Massacre
Many Salvadorans and human rights advocates around the world have welcomed the start of the trial.
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Migrants who turn themselves in to U.S. border patrol and request asylum are now sent back to El Salvador while their asylum claims are processed. (Photo: Reuters/Loren Elliott) Views
Deported to Death: US Sent 138 Salvadorans Home to Be Killed
The murders of 138 deportees belie any notion that El Salvador can protect citizens who are under threat.
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As seen through fencing, migrants—including a young child—stand while being detained by Department of Homeland Security police after crossing to the U.S. side of the U.S.-Mexico border barrier, on June 27, 2019 in El Paso, Texas. News
US Has Knowingly Sent Migrants and Refugees to Danger in El Salvador for Years: Report
"Absolutely horrific."
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While the US arms industry is presumably feeling pretty secure right about now, it is safe to say many people in "safe third countries" are not. (Photo: Edgard Garrido/Reuters) Views
How the US Made the So-Called 'Safe Third Countries' Unsafe
Despite Donald Trump's claims, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are everything but safe.
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GUATEMALA COUP, 1954. Colonel Miguel Mendoza, Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas, and Major Julio Gaitan (foreground, left-to-right), three leaders of the rebel invasion force which overthrew the government of President Jacobo Arbenz Guzman of Guatemala in 1954. Photographed 24 June 1954. (Photo: ullstein bild via Getty Images) Views
Coming to Terms With the U.S. Role in Central America
U.S. military intervention has played an important role in the instability, poverty, and violence that drives tens of thousands of people from the Central American countries toward Mexico and the United States.
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Trump Condemned for 'Morally Reprehensible' Plan That Rights Groups Warn Means Death for Asylum-Seekers
"Instead of offering protection to people fleeing these conditions, the United States is instead pursuing a disastrous plan that could carry deadly consequences."
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People carry the coffin of indigenous leader and environmental activist Berta Caceres, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, March 3, 2016. (Photo: CNS/EPA/Stringer) Views
Violence Against Indigenous Hondurans Shows Us What Fuels Migration
The United States government bears direct responsibility for the violence—militarizing the region and ensuring U.S. corporations can extract profit and resources.
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