The Cake That This Country Baked

The Cake That This Country Baked

[[{"fid":"102573","view_mode":"full","fields":{"format":"full","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_css_class[und]":"_none"},"type":"media","attributes":{"class":"media-element file-full _none"}}]]

Iconic moment in Baton Rouge. Photo by Jonathan Bachman/ Reuters

A year after Sandra Bland's arrest and death, America's streets are filled with righteous rage. Surfacing on social media are surreal videos of mass arrests - including the live-streamed one of Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson, now out on bond - and hordes of jumpy, chanting, goose-stepping, assault-rifle-wielding robocop stormtroopers in seemingly unlikely places like Rochester N.Y. facing off against stately, placid protesters demanding only what this country blithely continues to insist it believes in: equality before the law, and not being shot down for breathing while black. Meanwhile, even as Baton Rouge threatens to become a sinister new flashpoint - likened to Ferguson, Syria, Tiananmen Square - there is growing recognition, even on the right, that Dallas and all that came before had a sorry historic inevitability. Given our abundant guns, our modern-day racism, our murderous, militarized police, and the "violent and deeply unethical founding and growth of this country," Shaun King argues, Micah Johnson was "the cake that this country baked."

[[{"fid":"102574","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_css_class[und]":"_none"},"type":"media","attributes":{"class":"media-element file-default _none"}}]]

Livestream arrest of McKesson

Share This Article