Putting A Face On the Statistics in Mexico's (Otherwise Unsuccessful) War on Drugs

Abby Zimet

A similar project by JR in Ramallah

After five years of Mexico's bloody, ineffective war on drugs, over half the  population say they feel unsafe in their own neighborhoods and activist residents are turning to communal art projects and other grassroots efforts to combat the violence by increasing awareness of its impact. Those with "credentials of blood" are publishing Portraits for Peace, making videos to share stories, and now, inspired by the international street artist JR, putting up huge photographic portraits of victims to put people "in the shoes of the other."

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