William K. Black

William K. Black

William K. Black is an associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. A former bank regulator who led investigations of the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s, he is the author of the book "The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One." Follow him on Twitter:  @WilliamKBlack

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017
A Refutation of Neoliberalism's Defenders in Ecuador
In March, more than fifty economists signed onto an open letter , written by professors Ha-Joon Chang of the University of Cambridge and James K. Galbraith of the University of Texas at Austin, ahead of this year’s presidential elections in Ecuador. The letter noted: Over the past ten years,...
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Wednesday, April 05, 2017
People Reject Neoliberalism's Return, But Challenges Remain in Ecuador
Ecuador has just staged another successful democratic election—as even the Wall Street Journal now reports, based on international election observers from the Organization of American States (OAS) that have no love for the Ecuadorian party that won the election. Most of the foreign reportage on the...
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Sunday, April 02, 2017
Ecuador’s Tax Evading Oligarchs Try to Reconquer the Nation
The democratic elections of President Rafael Correa in Ecuador have enraged the oligarchs, particularly the wealthiest bankers who ruled and predated on the nation for so many decades. That predation led to a massive banking crisis led by fraudulent elite bankers. Ecuadorians fled the nation in...
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Sunday, July 24, 2016
Hillary-Kaine: Back to the Center
By picking Sen. Tim Kaine, Hillary Clinton has revealed her true preferences and shown that her move to the left on policy issues during the primaries was simply a tactical move to defeat Bernie Sanders. It’s not what you say, it’s what you do. Clinton can talk about caring about the U.S. public,...
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Tuesday, July 05, 2016
Obsessing About The “Thin Blue Lines” While Elite White-Collar Crime Runs Rampant
The New York Times published a book review entitled “Thin Blue Lines.” The two books reviewed were about street crimes. Based solely on reading the NYT book review, and wearing my criminology hat, neither book adds materially to the useful literature. The two books, and the book review, however,...
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Wednesday, December 31, 2014
Greece, the Troika, and the New York Times
As I have explained in prior articles, there is an excellent chance that the Troika’s infliction of austerity on the eurozone’s periphery could, as with the austerity inflicted under the Washington Consensus continue to produce such long-term rolling recessions that it creates a political dynamic...
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Monday, December 10, 2012
Why Is the Failed Monti a 'Technocrat' and the Successful Correa a 'Left-Leaning Economist'?
The New York Times produces profiles of national leaders like Italy’s Mario Monti and Ecuador’s Rafael Correa . I invite readers to contrast the worshipful treatment accorded Monti with the Correa profile. The next time someone tells you the NYT is a “leftist” paper you can show them how far right it is on financial issues.
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Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Wall Street Uses "Liberal" Front Group to Lead Its Assault on Social Security
Third Way, lobbyists for and from Wall Street who are leading the effort to enrich Wall Street by privatizing Social Security, was created by Wall Street to fool some of the people all of the time.
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Tuesday, October 30, 2012
The Great Betrayal – and the Cynicism of Calling it a Grand Bargain
Robert Kuttner has written much of the column I intended to write on this subject, so I will point you to his excellent column and add a few thoughts.
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Tuesday, June 12, 2012
The JOBS Act and Green Slime
We learned recently about the secret adulteration of our hamburgers with “pink slime.” Agribusiness companies created pink slime from ultra-fatty beef tissue that was more likely to harbor salmonella and e coli . They processed it with ammonia (Mr. Clean) in a partially successful effort to reduce the risk of infecting the consumer. Pink slime, unbeknownst to the public, comprised up to 15% of our hamburgers.
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