Wendell Potter

Wendell Potter

Wendell Potter is former Vice President of corporate communications at CIGNA, one of the United States' largest health insurance companies. In June 2009, he testified against the HMO industry in the U.S. Senate as a whistleblower. He is now the Senior Fellow on Health Care for the Center for Media and Democracy in Madison, Wisconsin.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, June 14, 2011
Health Insurers Pump Your Premiums Into a Financial Black Hole
Ever wonder what happens to the premiums you pay for your health insurance? You might be surprised to learn that more and more of the dollars you pay for coverage are being sucked into a kind of black hole.
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Tuesday, May 31, 2011
Health Insurers Have Had Their Chance
Of the many supporters of a single-payer health care system in the United States, some of the most ardent are small business owners who have struggled to continue offering coverage to their workers. Among them are David Steil, a small business owner and former Republican -- yes, Republican -- state legislator in Pennsylvania who earlier this year became president of the advocacy group Health Care 4 All PA.
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Thursday, May 05, 2011
Are Health Insurers Writing Health Reform Regulations?
One of the reasons I wanted to return to journalism after a long career as an insurance company PR man was to keep an eye on the implementation of the new health reform law. Many journalists who covered the reform debate have moved on, and some consider the writing of regulations to implement the legislation boring and of little interest to the public.
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Friday, April 29, 2011
Insurers Getting Rich By Not Paying for Care
If I had stayed in the insurance industry, my net worth would have spiked between 4 p.m. Wednesday and 4 p.m. Thursday last week -- and I wouldn't even have had to show up for work.
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Friday, April 22, 2011
GOP's Medicare Plan Would Be a Windfall for Insurers
Rep. Paul Ryan 's plan to privatize Medicare would accelerate a trend started several years ago by corporate CEOs and their political allies to shift ever-increasing amounts of risk from Big Business and the government to workers and retirees. If enacted, the Ryan plan would represent a windfall of unprecedented proportions for insurance corporations and other businesses.
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Thursday, April 07, 2011
Who, Not What, Is Behind GOP Medicare Plan? The Private Insurance Industry
Democrats who think Paul Ryan and his Republican colleagues have foolishly wrapped their arms around the third rail of American politics by proposing to hand the Medicare program to private insurers will themselves look foolish if they take for granted that the public will always be on their side.
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Tuesday, February 08, 2011
The Insurers’ Real Agenda for Change
The media had lots of health care news to obsess about last week. A federal judge ruled the health care reform law unconstitutional, and Senate Republicans tried in vain to repeal the law. But most of the press paid virtually no attention to a potentially much more important development - a multi-pronged effort by five major insurers to strip from the law key regulations and consumer protections that aren't to their liking.
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Wednesday, January 12, 2011
Deadly Spin on Health Care Repeal
Advocates of health care reform who are fearful -- or hopeful, as the case may be -- that Republicans will be able to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) need to understand that the GOP has no real intention of repealing it.
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Monday, November 22, 2010
My Apologies to Michael Moore and the Health Insurance Industry
In advance of my appearance with Michael Moore on Countdown with Keith Olbermann tonight on MSNBC (8 and 11 p.m.
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Wednesday, July 28, 2010
For-Profit Insurers Leaning on Regulators to "Reform" Health Reform
The nation's biggest insurers -- not happy with provisions of the four-month-old health care reform law that would force many of them to spend more of the money they collect in premiums for their policyholders' medical care -- are pressuring regulators to disregard what members of Congress intended when they wrote the law, so that they can keep raking in huge profits for their Wall Street owners. If they are successful, many policyholders will soon be shelling out even more than they do today to enrich insurance company shareholders and CEOs.
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