Tim Costello, Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith

Tim Costello, Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith are the co-founders of Global Labor Strategies, a resource center providing research and analysis on globalization, trade and labor issues. GLS staff have published many previous reports on a variety of labor-related issues, including Outsource This! American Workers, the Jobs Deficit, and the Fair Globalization Solution, Contingent Workers Fight For Fairness, and Fight Where You Stand!: Why Globalization Matters in Your Community and Workplace. They have also written and produced the Emmy-nominated PBS documentary Global Village or Global Pillage? GLS has offices in New York, Boston, and Montevideo, Uruguay. For more on GLS visit: www.laborstrategies.blogs.com or email smithb28@gmail.com.

 

Articles by this author

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Saturday, September 12, 2009
AFL-CIO Convention: Solidarity with Van Jones?
The attack that drove "green jobs czar" Van Jones from the White House this week is an attack on labor and on workers' best hope for good jobs. If labor wants to promote green jobs, labor should embrace Van Jones - publicly, loudly, and fast - at the upcoming AFL-CIO Convention .
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Wednesday, July 22, 2009
Lessons from Hard Times Past
We’re all struggling with how to think -- and what to do -- in the face of the “great recession.” An initial progressive response was to advocate better regulation; then Keynesian economic stimulus; now nationalization; perhaps in the future some kind of socialism. One theme that has reverberated through periods of “hard times” in the past is the idea of “production for use.” It has appeared in the form of public works job creation; worker run enterprises; self-help mutual aid; and efforts to push the envelope on property rights tha
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Saturday, March 21, 2009
How to Pay for a Global Climate Deal
The G-20 summit convening in London on April 2 is preparing to create a quarter trillion dollars of brand new stimulus money to help poor countries battle the global recession.
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Tuesday, March 17, 2009
Global Labor’s Forgotten Plan to Fight the Great Depression
In the early 1930s, as global unemployment tripled in two years and the world plunged into the Great Depression, the world's labor movements developed a program for fighting the global crisis through international public works. It's a little-known historical might-have-been that could have helped halt the Great Depression, the rise of Adolph Hitler, and the Second World War. And, as the efforts of world leaders to address today's "Great Recession" threaten to break down in nationalist rivalry and petty political bickering, it bears lessons - and perhaps an alternative
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Saturday, February 14, 2009
WSF: Is Another World Possible?
The recently concluded World Social Forum is a good gauge for assessing the state of the world's alternative social, economic and political movements.
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Friday, January 16, 2009
Social Movements 2.0
On September 27, 2007, the world experienced its first virtual strike. In response to a wage dispute, IBM workers in Italy organized a picket outside their company's "corporate campus" based in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life . According to a report in the Guardian , workers "marched and waved banners, gate-crashed a [virtual] staff meeting and forced the company to close its [virtual] business center to visitors....
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Tuesday, December 23, 2008
Green Paper Gold
There's growing support for fighting global economic stagnation and global warming simultaneously with a "green New Deal" nationally and globally. Investing to cut greenhouse gasses can create "green jobs" and provide fiscal stimulus while it is protecting the planet. But how is it going to be paid for?
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Saturday, December 13, 2008
How the American Healthcare System Got That Way
As Americans respond to President-elect Obama call for town hall meetings on reform the American health care system, an understanding of how that system came to be the way it is can be crucial for figuring out how to fix it. The American health care system is unique because for most of us it is tied to our jobs rather than to our government. For many Americans the system seems natural, but few know that it originated, not as a well thought out plan to provide for Americans' health, but as a way to circumvent a quirk in wartime wage regulations that had nothing to do with health.
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