Linda McQuaig

Linda McQuaig

Linda McQuaig is an author, journalist, and former NDP candidate for Toronto Centre in the Canadian federal election. She is also the author (with Neil Brooks) of Billionaires’ Ball: Gluttony and Hubris in an Age of Epic Inequality, published by Beacon Press.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Profit Takes Precedence Over Reform
With the American right poised to derail yet another attempt to bring public health care to the United States, Canada has been dragged in for a disturbing cameo role. By any reasonable measure, our health-care system is stellar compared to theirs, yet ours has been cast as the scary bad guy to serve as a cautionary tale to those who consider it urgent to provide health-care coverage to the 47 million Americans without it.
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Tuesday, July 14, 2009
Rich Cause the Crisis, Workers Get the Blame
For a while, the Wall Street meltdown gave the rich a bad name. Even they seemed embarrassed by their own excess. There were reports of designer shops packaging purchases in plain paper bags. But as going downscale lost its novelty, the rich have grown weary of their own embarrassment. Gratuitous extravagance is making a comeback. I noticed a Tiffany's ad in a Toronto newspaper last week for a "diamond solitaire on a platinum band of channel-set diamonds. From $3,550 to $1,000,000."
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Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Bush's Willing Accomplice
Isolated, repudiated by his people and even shunned by his own party, George W. Bush – the lamest of lame ducks – still seems able to count on the support of at least one world leader: Stephen Harper. And so it was on the weekend, as it has so often been in the past two years, that our prime minister provided rare support for Bush as the soon-to-be former president battled against a chorus of world leaders urgently calling for a set of badly needed reforms.
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Tuesday, October 21, 2008
Maybe the Rich Are the Problem
John McCain clearly thought he'd found a winning issue last week when Barack Obama was caught on tape defending his plan to tax the rich and "spread the wealth around." Gotcha! For days, the faltering Republican nominee relentlessly harangued Obama for saying such a thing, championing "Joe the Plumber," whose confrontation with Obama had provoked the remark. Of course, many were surprised when Joe the Plumber turned out to be neither a real plumber nor a guy named Joe.
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Tuesday, October 07, 2008
Bulking up Pentagon North
With the prospect of a Harper majority hanging menacingly over the country, the mind inevitably turns to the question: Just what is the "secret agenda" lurking behind the friendly sweater? Actually, I don't believe there is one. The truth is that Stephen Harper has already laid out an agenda that would fundamentally change this country - in ways most Canadians would oppose.
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Tuesday, August 26, 2008
Twisting the Concept of 'Elite'
Clearly, a compulsory item future U.S. presidential candidates will have to commit to memory will be the number of houses they own. Sadly, however, there may be no other repercussion from Republican John McCain's inability last week to remember that he owned seven. Conservative pundits were quick to suggest that attempts by Democratic rival Barack Obama to make an issue out of McCain's wealth would backfire since, they said, Obama is the real elitist who's out of touch with ordinary Americans. This involves some twisted logic.
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Tuesday, August 12, 2008
Disarmed to Nuclear Danger
It's striking that the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons - arguably the most pressing issue humankind faces - has slipped so far off the political agenda it rarely merits a mention. Apart from the annual Aug. 6 anniversary of Hiroshima - acknowledged briefly in the media last week, including in a powerful documentary on CBC Newsworld - the issue seems to suffer the fate of subjects the media just doesn't consider hot enough to cover.
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Tuesday, July 15, 2008
Made in America Energy Policy
When Americans want something that lies in another country, the consequences for that other country can be severe. Even if they don't actually invade, they put a lot of pressure on lesser countries to behave as they want. Canada, for instance, hasn't been invaded by the United States since 1812, but Ottawa has proved highly co-operative with Washington's desire to have access to our oil. We are America's Number 1 supplier.
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Tuesday, July 01, 2008
Averting Our Gaze From US Cruelty
Does the president of the United States have the right to order a detainee buried alive? Oddly, this grotesque question was posed at a U.S. Congressional hearing last week. Even odder was the answer -- from John Yoo, former deputy assistant attorney general in the Bush administration, now a law professor at the University of California. "I don't think that I've ever given the advice that the president could bury somebody alive," Yoo told a judiciary subcommittee hearing into detainee interrogations.
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Tuesday, June 17, 2008
'Friendly Disrespect' for Market
It's been refreshing to see the General Motors workers in Oshawa refusing to submit passively to the dictates of the market. We've been taught that the market knows best. So workers are supposed to simply accept that market conditions have dictated the closure of their plant, eliminating 2,600 jobs. (The company's signed commitment to keep the Oshawa truck plant operating is supposed to count for nothing, when the market speaks.) Some 180,000 manufacturing jobs have been lost in Canada in the past two years while the federal government stood by doing nothing.
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