Abby Zimet, staff writer

Abby Zimet has edited CD's Further column since 2008. A longtime, award-winning print journalist for newspapers and magazines, she lived in the Maine woods for about a dozen years before moving to Portland in 1983. Having come of political age during the Vietnam War, she has long been involved in women's, labor, anti-war, social justice and refugee rights issues.

Articles by this author

Further
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Secrecy Inc: Activists Sue CIA Over Spying On Classified Report On Covert Torture Program
Because no one has yet been held accountable for U.S. torture practices widely deemed "sadistic and terrifying," two open-government and FOIA activists are suing the CIA for its continued secrecy about its alleged secret surveillance of Senate lawmakers secretly investigating secret Bush-era torture. Welcome to the most transparent - and Kafkaesque - administration in history.
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Further
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Playing Obscene War: On SWAT Teams and Baby Bou Bou
Last month, 19-month-old Bounkham Phonesavahn - aka Baby Bou Bou - was asleep in his crib in Atlanta when a SWAT team armed with assault rifles burst in and threw a flash bang grenade into his crib, critically burning him and blowing a hole in his chest so deep it exposed his ribs. Police found no drugs, guns or suspects. They later arrested the nephew of Bou's father for allegedly buying $50 worth of drugs. A new ACLU report War Comes Home finds Bou Bou's story is only slightly more awful than many other awful stories from a failed "War on Drugs" that's often more about race and class. Bou Bou remains in a medically induced coma, with a 50-50 chance of surviving. Warning: graphic photo of what we've wrought.
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Further
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Climate Hawks Vote
Arguing we shouldn't tolerate pols taking money from fossil fuel companies "whose business plan is to cook the planet," a new Super PAC is working to elect only those politicians who show leadership on climate change. Climate Change Hawks has compiled a score card for House Democrats, made its first endorsement, and begun raising money for "climate hawk leaders - those who prioritize and speak on the climate crisis."
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Further
Monday, June 23, 2014
Arming Missouri Teachers: Hugs Are No Longer Appropriate
Seeking to "empower" teachers as "the ultimate first responders," about a dozen Missouri school districts are paying $17,500 each for some of their teachers to get 40 hours of training using a Glock 19 semi-automatic - "easy to handle, and it goes bang every time" - for, God forbid, the next school shooting. Because with a newbie, freaked-out, ill-equipped educator suddenly called on to take split-second aim at a crazed shooter in a packed school full of skittering terrified kids on all sides, what could possibly go wrong?
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Further
Monday, June 23, 2014
To Tolerate Is To Encourage: Egypt's 'Judiciary' Redefines Farce, But Gets U.S. Weapons Anyway Because Sure
Egypt's grotesque sentencing of three Al Jazeera journalists to years in prison for doing their job is sparking well-earned outrage, with their boss declaring the decision "defies logic, sense and any semblance of justice.” Hopefully, outrage will likewise greet the news that, the day before, John Kerry was in Egypt assuring al-Sisi the U.S. will be sending Apache helicopters "very, very soon" to add to the $600 million of weaponry we've already sent, now that our two freedom-loving countries are "on a similar page" with their shared appreciation for "the essential role of a vibrant civil society, free press, rule of law and due process in a democracy."
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Further
Friday, June 20, 2014
The Land Is Our Mother: Protecting the Palestinian Terraces of Battir
In a rare sweet victory for Palestinians, UNESCO has granted endangered World Heritage status to the renowned ancient terraces and irrigation systems of Battir, a West Bank village just south of Jerusalem long under threat of destruction by Israel's separation wall. Palestine's UNESCO ambassador said the ruling would be "etched in the memory of my people." The lovely short film "Villagers on the Line" captures the lives, land, beauty and history at stake. Mazel tov to the people of Battir.
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Further
Friday, June 20, 2014
For A Solar Solstice
Saturday, the longest day of the year, will see a celebration of solar power with "Put Solar On It," a national day of action by The Climate Reality Project, Mosaic and other organizations. Arguing that solutions do exist to solve the climate crisis, organizers plan a host of events aimed at bringing solar power into communities.
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Friday, June 20, 2014
Obama In the Toilet
Addressing the Faith and Freedom Coalition's evangelical confab in D.C, Rand Paul described a nation "in a full-blown spiritual crisis" where he vowed to "stand up for unborn children" because "no nation (can) long endure that doesn't respect life from those that are not yet born to life's last breath" - except maybe for people who disagree with him, which is evidently why a likeness of Obama ended up in the urinals at the very respectful conference. Because nothing says faith, freedom, class and Christian grace like pissing on our duly elected president. From one 'pro-life' attendee: "The law of God is written on our hearts & it's not just a law but a call to mercy, compassion & love."
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Further
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Scott Walker Is A Crook, Just Like You Always Thought
In revelations from newly unsealed documents that should be more shocking than they are, Wisconsin prosecutors say Gov. Scott Walker was at the center of a wide-ranging "criminal scheme" to coordinate fundraising between his campaign and conservative groups - in violation of "multiple elections laws"- to fend off his richly-deserved recall in 2012. So much for Walker's gloating claim after his always-questionable victory that, "Voters really do want leaders who stand up and make the tough decisions."
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Further
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Trayvon, Still: Circumventing the Permitting Process
Troubled by Trayvon Martin's death and seeking to “have these conversations in the public space," a Boston street artist and professor has erected a small guerrilla monument to Martin on a lamp post stump he considered "ripe for intervention." He put the plaque, with a hoodie splayed on the ground, across from a Civil War monument as "a marker to how far we've come in terms of race relations...power and equality since the end of slavery." "I think there are many stories like his out there...I wanted it to be more open than just a memorial to Trayvon - I wanted it to be to all young people out there with a hoodie talking on a cell phone to a friend."
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