Historic Democracy Mobilization Marks New Phase in Movement for Reforms

For Immediate Release


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Historic Democracy Mobilization Marks New Phase in Movement for Reforms

Statement of Democracy Awakening and Democracy Spring

WASHINGTON - A week’s worth of historic actions in Washington, D.C., to rescue our democracy have now concluded. All of the hundreds of organizations involved in the mass mobilization agree: This is a beginning, not an end. It is the beginning of a new nationwide push for democracy reforms, involving more people, more protests and more nonviolent civil disobedience.

Over the past week, thousands came from around the country – from virtually every state in the nation – to march, rally, attend teach-ins and engage in civil disobedience. The week’s actions featured what may have been the largest civil disobedience action during this century, and the largest democracy-focused protest in a generation.

The message from activists to policymakers was this: On voting rights, money in politics and the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy, Congress is failing to do its job and ignoring the will of the people. The coordinated mobilizations organized by Democracy Awakening and Democracy Spring were not about the moment, they were about building and strengthening a sustained and powerful democracy movement.

We are inspired by all the people who took time to come to D.C. and take a stand for democracy. Below are numbers that provide a snapshot of the mobilizations.

Number of days of action in Washington, D.C.: 8
Number of people arrested for protesting on behalf of democracy, April 11-18: more than 1,300
Number of people who attended Sunday’s march and rally: 5,000
Number of people who attended Saturday’s teach-ins: 750
Number of people who lobbied Congress on Monday: 150
Number of people who marched 140 miles from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C.: 160


Public Citizen is a national, nonprofit consumer advocacy organization founded in 1971 to represent consumer interests in Congress, the executive branch and the courts.

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