CCFC Statement on New Report: “Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013”

For Immediate Release

CCFC Statement on New Report: “Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013”

WASHINGTON - Today, Common Sense Media released a new report, “Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013.” The report is the most complete look at the media habits of young children to date. Below is CCFC Director Dr. Susan Linn’s statement on the findings:

This important report provides the first evidence that the coordinated and persistent efforts of parents and public health advocates to reduce children’s screen time are having an impact. It is truly good news that, on average, young children are spending less time with screen media than they were two years ago.

At the same, we have reason to be concerned. Most troubling, the total amount of time that babies spend with all forms of screen media has not decreased – despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics to discourage screen time in the first years of life. And many more babies and toddlers are using mobile devices. Given the negative association between excessive screen time and school achievement it is also worrisome that children from lower income families continue to spend more time watching television than their wealthier peers.

For these reasons, it is important that reducing screen time for young children and promoting healthy alternatives continue to be priorities for anyone who cares about children’s health and wellbeing.

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To read the full report please visit: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/zero-to-eight-childrens-media-u...

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The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood is a national coalition of health care professionals, educators, advocacy groups and concerned parents who counter the harmful effects of marketing to children through action, advocacy, education, research, and collaboration among organizations and individuals who care about children. CCFC is a project of Third Sector New England (www.tsne.org).

 

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