Lawyers For Guantánamo Prisoner In Court Friday To Defend Successful Challenge To Detention

For Immediate Release

Lawyers For Guantánamo Prisoner In Court Friday To Defend Successful Challenge To Detention

Court Should Uphold Habeas Ruling In Salahi Case, Says ACLU

NEW YORK - The
American Civil Liberties Union and attorneys from the law firm Freedman
Boyd Hollander Goldberg Ives & Duncan P.A. will argue Friday,
September 17, that a federal appeals court should uphold Guantánamo
prisoner Mohamedou Ould Salahi's successful challenge to his unlawful
detention. A federal judge ordered Salahi released from Guantánamo in
March on the grounds that he was being held unlawfully, but the U.S.
government is challenging that ruling.

After being arrested in Mauritania in
2001 on suspicion of ties to al Qaeda, Salahi was rendered by the U.S.
government to Jordan, where he was detained, interrogated and abused for
eight months. He was then rendered to Bagram, Afghanistan and finally
to Guantánamo, where he has been held since August 2002.

WHAT:

Arguments in the U.S. government's appeal of a ruling ordering the release of Guantánamo prisoner Mohamedou Ould Salahi

WHO:

Theresa Duncan of the law firm
Freedman Boyd Hollander Goldberg Ives & Duncan P.A. will argue
before Judges Sentelle, Tatel and Brown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia Circuit. In addition to Duncan, lawyers on the
case are Melissa Goodman and Jonathan Manes of the ACLU National
Security Project; Jonathan Hafetz, cooperating attorney with the ACLU;
Nancy Hollander of Freedman Boyd Hollander Goldberg Ives & Duncan
P.A. and Linda Moreno of Linda Moreno P.A.

WHERE:

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

333 Constitution Ave. NW

Washington, D.C.

WHEN:

Friday, September 17, 2010

9:30 a.m. EDT

 

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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) conserves America's original civic values working in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in the United States by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

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