Egypt’s Courts Further Repression with Journos on Trial & Mass Death Sentence for Morsi Supporters

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Democracy Now!

Egypt’s Courts Further Repression with Journos on Trial & Mass Death Sentence for Morsi Supporters

Egypt is facing international criticism after the largest mass sentencing in its modern history.

On Monday, 529 supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi were ordered killed over the death of a single police officer in protests last summer. The trial lasted just over two days, with the majority tried in absentia.

The exceptionally swift trial and harsh sentences mark a new escalation of the Egyptian military regime’s crackdown on Morsi supporters, which has led to hundreds of deaths and thousands of arrests. In another closely watched trial, Al Jazeera journalists Peter Greste, Baher Mohamed and Mohamed Fahmy have been denied bail after nearly three months in prison. They are accused of belonging to or aiding a terrorist organization. Meanwhile, two leading Egyptian activists have been freed after over 100 days behind bars. Alaa Abd El-Fattah and Ahmed Abdel Rahman are among a group of activists charged with violating the military regime’s anti-protest law. They and 23 others have been released on bail but still face a trial that resumes next month.

We go to Cairo to speak with Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous.

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