Anonymous Releases NSA Docs Related to Global Spy Network

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Common Dreams

Anonymous Releases NSA Docs Related to Global Spy Network

by
Common Dreams staff

Amid the explosive back-to-back revelations made by the Guardian and Washington Post regarding a pair of National Security Agency surveillence programs this week, the hacktivist group Anonymous on Friday released what they claim are additional NSA documents that both deepen and expand on those earlier revelations.

In a statement that accompanied the release of the thirteen documents—and addressed to "the citizens of the world"—Anonymous said the information they contain proves "the NSA is spying on you, and not just Americans."

The group claims that the global intelligence apparatus discussed within some of the documents shows that government agencies "are spying on the citizens of over 35 different countries" and that this is being "done in cooperation with private businesses, and intelligence partners" across the globe.

That statement seems like a specifc reference to what one of the documents details as the Department of Defense's Global Information Grid (or GIG), designed to " enable the secure, agile, robust, dependable, interoperable data sharing environment for the Department where warfighter, business, and intelligence users share knowledge on  a global network that facilitates information superiority, accelerates  decision-making, effective operations, and Net-Centric transformation."

"Your privacy and freedoms are slowly being taken from you, in closed door meetings, in laws buried in bills, and by people who are supposed to be protecting you." - Anonymous

"We bring this to you," the Anonymous statement explained, "so that you know just how little rights you have. Your privacy and freedoms are slowly being taken from you, in closed door meetings, in laws buried in bills, and by people who are supposed to be protecting you."

Though some of the documents contained in the dump appear to be from the public domain, it is unclear how all of them may have been obtained.

As U.S. News & World Report details, the documents "total thousands of pages, but among them include reports on the "Information Sharing Environment," "Suspicious Activity Reporting," a list of names from the Intelligence and National Security Alliance (an intelligence research group) spy list, reports on the Department of Defense's "Information Enterprise" and a discussion about the government's "Net Centric Environment."

The thirteen documents were posted in a list and included as a digital index, reproduced below:

But, as Gizmodo writer Chris Mills warns:

Hit up the documents for further details; just be warned that although this might look like the plot of a B-list movie starring Aston Kutcher, the docs themselves are incredibly dry and full of more acronyms than whatever presentation you should be working on.

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