Lawyers Scarce for Poor Facing Foreclosure

Published on
by
USA Today

Lawyers Scarce for Poor Facing Foreclosure

by
Brad Heath

A pre-foreclosure sign is displayed outside a home on Thursday in Miami. A new study by the Brennan Center for Justice found that many people now face complicated foreclosure proceedings with "no opportunity to obtain help from a lawyer." The deluge is hitting cities across the country, including Cleveland, Las Vegas, Washington, Phoenix and Miami. (Joe Raedle, Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — The nation's foreclosure crisis
has swamped lawyers for the poor, leaving thousands of low-income
homeowners across the country without legal assistance that could save
their homes.

Legal offices providing help to the poor are
turning away many who have been hit hard by the economy, according to
lawyers in cities across the country who were interviewed by USA TODAY.

A study to be released today by the Brennan
Center for Justice found that many people now face complicated
foreclosure proceedings with "no opportunity to obtain help from a
lawyer."

The deluge is hitting cities across the country: Cleveland, Las Vegas,
Washington, Phoenix, and others, USA TODAY found. In Chicago, the
number of people seeking help has more than doubled over the past two
years, says Dan Lindsey, who supervises a foreclosure program there. In
Miami, so many people started seeking help that the local legal aid
office now turns away everyone but people over 60 and families with
children, says senior attorney Carolina Lombardi.

"It's overwhelming how many people don't have
representation," says Melanca Clark, a Brennan Center for Justice
lawyer and the study's author. "People don't know what to do when they
have to go through this alone."

The Brennan Center, part of the New York University
law school, found that it's tough to get help in several states. In
parts of New York, more than 80% of homeowners facing foreclosures on
high-risk mortgages did not have a lawyer. In Connecticut, about 60% of
property owners didn't have a lawyer.

Hiring a private lawyer can cost over $5,000, a
price out of reach for most homeowners who can't pay their mortgages,
says AnnaMarie Johnson, executive director of Nevada Legal Services.

Meanwhile, the tide of foreclosures shows little
sign of ebbing. The number of foreclosure filings last month was nearly
18% higher than in August 2008, according to the tracking firm
RealtyTrac.

 

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