News for 2009-05-12

Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Edible Schoolyard in the Documentary Film 'Food Fight'
Food Fight is a fascinating look at how American agricultural policy and food culture developed in the 20th century, and how the California food movement has created a counter-revolution against big agribusiness.
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US Elected to UN Rights Council
The United States has been elected to a seat on the UN Human Rights Council for the first time. The council had been shunned by the Bush administration, which accused it of admitting states with poor rights records and having an anti-Israel bias. But the Obama administration has reversed its...
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Haaretz Reporter Amira Hass Arrested Upon Leaving Gaza
Israel Police on Tuesday detained Haaretz correspondent Amira Hass upon her exit from the Gaza Strip, where she had been living and reporting over the last few months. Hass was arrested and taken in for questioning immediately after crossing the border, for violating a law which forbids residence...
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Massacre Puts War Trauma Under the Spotlight
SAN FRANCISCO - A U.S. soldier shot five of his colleagues dead at a base in Baghdad, Iraq Monday. The Pentagon says at least two other people were hurt in the shootings and the gunman is in custody. Details are still coming in, but the incident reportedly happened at a stress clinic where troops...
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Canadian Military Plans to Spam Afghans This Summer
OTTAWA - Canada plans to boost its propaganda reach by tapping into mobile phones in Afghanistan to send text messages, run contests and drive listeners to its military-run, Pashto-language radio station. It's a fairly crude, transparent tactic in the high science of counter-insurgency, but the...
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Badly-Needed California Water Transfers Blocked by Economic, Environmental Hurdles
As another summer of drought approaches, hundreds of thousands of acres of San Joaquin Valley farmland are expected to be fallowed, and much of urban California faces 20 percent water cutbacks. But in the Sacramento Valley, rice farmers have been busy for weeks spreading water 6 inches deep over a...
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Swat Valley Death Toll Rises
A suicide bomber killed 10 people at a security post as troops battled the insurgency just 80 miles from the capital Islamabad. The fighting has led to an exodus of people from the valley, and there are now fears of a humanitarian crisis. At least 360,000 people have left their homes in recent days...
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High Health Costs Hit Women Hardest
CHICAGO - Most working-age women in the United States have too little health coverage, and often forgo needed care because of cost, U.S. researchers said on Monday. They found that seven out of 10 women have no insurance, not enough insurance or are in debt because of medical bills. "More families...
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China Marks Anniversary of Quake
BEIJING - One year after a massive earthquake devastated parts of Sichuan Province, China paused Tuesday to remember the nearly 90,000 people left dead or missing by the disaster and to thank international donors for their help with the recovery effort. But the anniversary was dogged by continuing...
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Cleaner Air From Reduced Emissions Could Save Millions of Lives, Says Report
Tackling climate change by cutting greenhouse gas emissions could save millions of lives because of the cleaner air that would result, according to a recent study. Researchers predict that, by 2050, about 100 million premature deaths caused by respiratory health problems linked to air pollution...
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Top US Commander in Afghanistan Is Fired
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates announced yesterday that he had requested the resignation of the top American general in Afghanistan, Gen. David D. McKiernan, making a rare decision to remove a wartime commander at a time when the Obama administration has voiced increasing alarm about the country...
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A Year Later, Iowa Raid Still Marks a Flashpoint
POSTVILLE, Iowa - If there is an epicenter in the shifting, emotionally charged debate over U.S. immigration policy, it is here, amid some of the richest soil on Earth. That alluvial black dirt nurtures corn, beef cattle, chickens and turkeys, which require massive slaughterhouses. And that in turn...
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