U.S. Aid Wrapped In A Body Bag: Suing the Drone Makers

U.S. Aid Wrapped In A Body Bag: Suing the Drone Makers

Mohammed Al-Qawli, an educational consultant in Yemen, remains haunted by the day in January 2013 he spent hours trying to collect the body parts of his brother Ali, a schoolteacher, and his cousin Salim, a student, both "accidentally" killed in a U.S. drone strike. Now Al-Qawli and human rights group Reprieve are mounting a legal challenge against the U.K government for failing to investigate violations of international law by communications giant British Telecom, which is allegedly facilitating U.S. strikes that have killed perhaps 1,000 Yemenis. In April, Al-Qawli also launched the National Organization for Drone Victims in memory of his brother to allow "the voices of victims" to be heard and to work to end an ongoing U.S. targeted killing program that has had a "devastating" effect on communities throughout Yemen. While "Ali al-Qawli the schoolteacher has left us," he notes, "his tremendous legacy of love, passion and hope remains...I hope that the American people (will) stand against the violent actions of their Nobel Peace Prize–winning president and join us in demanding that the U.S. government stop its blind killing of hundreds of innocent people."

"I’d heard that the United States of America was sending support to Yemen, but for a long time I did not know what that meant. Now I can see it firsthand. I have received U.S. gifts and U.S. aid, wrapped in a body bag. These explosive fragments kill Yemenis, destroy their spirits, burn their bodies and only further empower the militants. The U.S. and Yemeni governments killed a young man who strongly opposed terrorism and tried to bring change through education - the very same things they purport to want themselves. I want to know why."

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