The Biggest, Baddest, Darkest Money (and No, WSJ, It's Not From Big Bad Organized Labor)

The Biggest, Baddest, Darkest Money (and No, WSJ, It's Not From Big Bad Organized Labor)

by
Abby Zimet

Way upset about Harry Reid's ridiculous recent charge that the poor ole Koch Brothers spend an obscene amount of money to "rig the system" and "buy elections," the Wall Street Journal's Kimberley Strassel wrote a nasty column arguing the "really big money" comes not from the beleaguered Koch empire but - parroting an oft-cited, long-refuted claim on the right - from the unions, which "glide blissfully, unmolestedly along," buying our democracy. By her figuring,  based on numbers from the Center for Responsive Politics, organized labor actually outspent the Koch machine by over $600 million. Alas, both her numbers and eyesight are bogus: She evidently fails to see the Center's vital disclaimer that the numbers exclude Super PAC and undisclosed dark money spending, which for years has been how the Koch Brothers route their abundant political contributions to, yes, buy our democracy. In the last election, Koch PAC spent $4.9 million in disclosed contributions, but over $407 million in undisclosed places. When the Republic Report broke down the CRP numbers, they found that Koch groups alone spent more than double the combined political spending (including to undisclosed groups) for the top ten unions combined - whose contribution figures, it's noted, might in fact be inflated there. The New Republic also took on CRP's math: They found about $850,000 of influence per Koch brother vs. $1.65 per union member, meaning it would take about 515,000 union members to have the same influence as one Koch brother. See it all in two eye-popping charts. And beware what you read in the press, especially when owned by Murdoch and his really big money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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- See more at: http://www.republicreport.org/2014/unions-koch/#sthash.DplUvwwt.dpuf

The Wall Street Journal’s Kimberley Strassel either has no understanding of campaign finance, or is willfully misleading her readers. In either case, her column today about the Koch brothers’ political spending — which parrots a meme that has bounced around conservative blogs and websites like a bad chain e-mail — gets the facts about Koch spending versus union spending completely wrong.

In her column, “The Really Big Money? Not the Kochs,” Strassel cites a Center for Responsive Politics list to claim that unions “collectively spent $620,873,623 more than Koch Industries” on political races. Of course, if you actually visit this page on the CRP website, the list runs below a disclaimer noting that it does not include certain Super PAC spending or most undisclosed dark money spending, the preferred route for the Koch brothers for decades. In fact, the CRP site notes that union spending might appear inflated since unions traditional PAC spending is coupled with outside Super PAC spending. For the purposes of this chart, union spending is inflated compared to the giving of companies like Koch or Super PAC donors like Sheldon Adelson.

For the last election, Koch PAC spent $4.9 million in disclosed contributions (figures that appear on the chart referenced by Strassel). But they also spent over $407 million on undisclosed campaign entities, which does not show up in the CRP chart.

Republic Report broke down the figures for the last election and found that Koch groups alone spent more than double the combined political spending (including to undisclosed group) for the top ten unions combined. The chart includes union spending on dark money Democratic groups and Koch spending on dark money groups like Americans for Prosperity. See below:

kochspending

 

This undisclosed campaign system is nothing new for the Koch brothers. In 1995 and 1996, Koch set up a shell company called Triad Management to spend millions in secret money to help the Republican Party. Of course, this type of spending never shows up in databases like the one cited by Strassel.

All NRLB-regulated unions, on the other hand, disclose every outside payment. Payments that cannot be found through the FEC can be found on a database maintained by the Labor Department. Individuals and corporations are under no such similar disclosure rules. The Koch money identified recently by the Washington Post, the $407 million, relates only to they money filtered through foundations and nonprofits. The money Koch spends as a corporate entity, which it has in the past, may have gone unreported.

- See more at: http://www.republicreport.org/2014/unions-koch/#sthash.IsrXrDod.dpuf

The Wall Street Journal’s Kimberley Strassel either has no understanding of campaign finance, or is willfully misleading her readers. In either case, her column today about the Koch brothers’ political spending — which parrots a meme that has bounced around conservative blogs and websites like a bad chain e-mail — gets the facts about Koch spending versus union spending completely wrong.

In her column, “The Really Big Money? Not the Kochs,” Strassel cites a Center for Responsive Politics list to claim that unions “collectively spent $620,873,623 more than Koch Industries” on political races. Of course, if you actually visit this page on the CRP website, the list runs below a disclaimer noting that it does not include certain Super PAC spending or most undisclosed dark money spending, the preferred route for the Koch brothers for decades. In fact, the CRP site notes that union spending might appear inflated since unions traditional PAC spending is coupled with outside Super PAC spending. For the purposes of this chart, union spending is inflated compared to the giving of companies like Koch or Super PAC donors like Sheldon Adelson.

For the last election, Koch PAC spent $4.9 million in disclosed contributions (figures that appear on the chart referenced by Strassel). But they also spent over $407 million on undisclosed campaign entities, which does not show up in the CRP chart.

Republic Report broke down the figures for the last election and found that Koch groups alone spent more than double the combined political spending (including to undisclosed group) for the top ten unions combined. The chart includes union spending on dark money Democratic groups and Koch spending on dark money groups like Americans for Prosperity. See below:

kochspending

 

This undisclosed campaign system is nothing new for the Koch brothers. In 1995 and 1996, Koch set up a shell company called Triad Management to spend millions in secret money to help the Republican Party. Of course, this type of spending never shows up in databases like the one cited by Strassel.

All NRLB-regulated unions, on the other hand, disclose every outside payment. Payments that cannot be found through the FEC can be found on a database maintained by the Labor Department. Individuals and corporations are under no such similar disclosure rules. The Koch money identified recently by the Washington Post, the $407 million, relates only to they money filtered through foundations and nonprofits. The money Koch spends as a corporate entity, which it has in the past, may have gone unreported.

- See more at: http://www.republicreport.org/2014/unions-koch/#sthash.IsrXrDod.dpuf

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