Banning Books On the Truth of the Human Condition 'Cause (Eww) Sex, Death and Racism

Banning Books On the Truth of the Human Condition 'Cause (Eww) Sex, Death and Racism

by
Abby Zimet

Last week, good ole North Carolina, whose wacko right-wing majority has been some busy passing laws that hurt women, minorities, the poor and the environment, got a nice jump on National Banned Books Week by banning of Ralph Ellison's  Invisible Man, which Ellison described in his speech accepting the National Book Award as "a return to the mood of personal moral responsibility for democracy." Ellison's classic about American racism, about being "a man of substance, of flesh and bone," who is not seen because he's black, was evidently banned after one parent complained it was "not so innocent...filthier....too much for teenagers"; school board members agreed it was "a hard read" that "didn't (have) any literary value." Banning books is a time-tested, spirit-deadening tradition in fearful communities; there were 464 challenges to books reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom in 2012, with The Bluest Eye and Persopolis perhaps the most recently banned. In the past, almost half of what are widely viewed as the top 100 novels of the 20th century have been banned or challenged, including The Grapes of Wrath, The Catcher in the Rye, To Kill A Mockingbird, The Color Purple, 1984, Ulysses, Sophie's  Choice, Rabbit Run, Slaughterhouse-Five, A Farewell to Arms, and An American Tragedy, which it is.

"I am an invisible man...No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids—and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination—indeed, everything and anything except me."

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