In Wisconsin Assembly, No Signs, No Cameras, No Outbursts, No Duct Tape. Soon, (Almost) No Abortion

In Wisconsin Assembly, No Signs, No Cameras, No Outbursts, No Duct Tape. Soon, (Almost) No Abortion

by
Abby Zimet

n ten days and with almost no debate, the GOP/Scott Walker fiefdom formerly known as Wisconsin has fast-tracked three anti-abortion bills ostensibly about "having full knowledge of the decision that women are about to make" - including one mandating that a medically unnecessary ultrasound be performed on a pregnant woman, with the image, fetal heartbeat and description of the fetus provided to her - even though doctors' groups oppose them. The votes came as citizens sat in an Assembly Gallery lined with Capitol Police who by order of the Republican Speaker ejected the first two rows, told women with duct tape on their mouths to take it off or face arrest, and then glared at them as they sat silently with hands over their mouths. Brief debate was cut off by a feverish Speaker screaming debate was over and pounding his gavel so hard he broke it, a pretty good metaphor for the democratic process in Wisconsin. Despite what doctors decry as "the relentless legislative assault on the patient-physician relationship" over the last few years, the bills await Gov. Walkers signature, which should be in blood but likely won't be.

"We are speaking out not just on behalf of ob-gyns, but for all physicians and patients. Many of these laws are dangerous to patients’ health and safety. As physicians, we are obligated to offer the best evidence-based care to our patients. Government should stay out of imposing its political agenda on medical practice.” - American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

       

“We are speaking out not just on behalf of ob-gyns, but for all physicians and patients... Many of these laws are dangerous to patients’ health and safety. As physicians, we are obligated to offer the best evidence-based care to our patients. Government should stay out of imposing its political agenda on medical practice."

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