That Is What People Are Eating: Charges Dropped in First Ag-Gag Case

That Is What People Are Eating: Charges Dropped in First Ag-Gag Case

by
Abby Zimet

Utah prosecutors have abruptly dropped the case against Amy Meyer, the first person charged under the state's - and possibly the country's - so-called "ag gag" laws aimed at silencing critics of the often-horrific abuses at factory farms, after she filmed a slaughterhouse from the side of a road. Meyer had faced a class B misdemeanor for "agricultural operation interference" for using her cellphone to record scenes at Draper City's Dale Smith Meatpacking Company - owned, coincidentally, by the town's mayor, but no conflict of interest here. Prosecutors said it was "not in the interest of justice" to pursue the case after evidence showed Meyer was on public property, which is, after all, like, you know, public. At least half a dozen other states are considering laws similar to Utah's. Encouragingly, there has been alot of public backlash. May it thrive.

“What I saw was upsetting, to say the least. Cows being led inside the building struggled to turn around once they smelled and heard the misery that awaited them inside. I saw piles of horns scattered around the property and flesh being spewed from a chute on the side of the building. I also witnessed what I believe to be a clear act of cruelty to animals – a live cow who appeared to be sick or injured being carried away from the building in a tractor, as though she were nothing more than rubble.....We have every right to see what is happening inside those buildings. That is what people, consumers, are eating."

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