Donate Today!


 

EMAIL SIGN UP!

 

Popular content

On Race and Justice: An Apology, An Indictment

by Abby Zimet

While many people view "Stand Your Ground" laws as today's symbol for what's wrong with our criminal justice system, a suggestion we look deeper and further - to the country's long history of racial bias in jury selection, especially in death penalty cases. Last week, a North Carolina judge vacated the death sentence of Marcus Robinson under the state's Racial Justice Act citing a "wealth of evidence showing the persistent, pervasive, and distorting role of race in jury selection" - the first time racial bias has been rejected as unacceptable since the 25-year-old Supreme Court ruling in McCleskey v. Kemp that such bias is an “inevitable part of our criminal justice system,” and so be it. Meanwhile, the executions - technically legal, but relatively rare - go on, with Texas accounting for over a third of the total. The Economist maps out each one since 1976.

 

Comments

Note: Disqus 2012 is best viewed on an up to date browser. Click here for information. Instructions for how to sign up to comment can be viewed here. Our Comment Policy can be viewed here. Please follow the guidelines. Note to Readers: Spam Filter May Capture Legitimate Comments...