A Small But Exceedingly Well-Chronicled Moment In A Long War

A Small But Exceedingly Well-Chronicled Moment In A Long War

by
Abby Zimet

The New Yorker takes a look at the iconic moment early in the
war in Iraq when the statue of Saddam Hussein was toppled, what it did
and did not mean, and what the media's love of wartime mythmaking - what
Walter Lippmann called "the casual fact, the creative imagination, the
will to believe" - made of it. U.S. officials, of course, fed that lie, like all the rest.

"The scenes of free Iraqis celebrating in the
streets, riding American tanks, tearing down the statues of Saddam
Hussein in the center of Baghdad are breathtaking." -  Secretary of Defense Donald
Rumsfeld.

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