Londoners On Why They Marched Against Bush
Published on Friday, November 21, 2003 by the Guardian/UK
Why I am Here
'I cannot stand by and watch as we are used as a tool by the US'
 

Mohammed Khokhar, 45, London
I am not stupid, I know the reality of what happened and I know that war is sometimes necessary. But this is wrong.

It's these men, Bush and Blair, that are causing terrible problems for the world.

I've lived in this country for 20 years and I am proud to live here, it's my children's home. I would defend this country if we were under threat, but I am not prepared to stand by and watch as we are used as a tool by the US. The situation now in Iraq and Afghanistan is very wrong and it is making a lot of decent people very angry. I hope that Bush and Blair realise this and realise the danger they are causing.

Fiona McPhail, 19, Glasgow
This demonstration may not have an immediate effect - I don't expect Bush or Blair will take any notice of us at all, going on their past record - but I do hope this demonstration will give others, especially in the US, the confidence to oppose what Bush is doing.

Each act like this strengthens the case not just against what is happening in Iraq or what Bush is doing in other places, but also against the capitalist system.

It may take a couple of months, or it may take a lot, lot longer, but in the end we'll win.

Ally Atkinson, 50, Cornwall
We felt very strongly about coming here today. It's very easy to stick in nice, safe Cornwall and pretend the problems of the world don't effect you. But, on a personal level, we wanted to come and voice our objections in the strongest possible way to what is being done in Iraq, because in the end it will effect us all.

Andre Horbath, 80, London
I am against Bush and all his friends. He has got blood on his hands and is stirring up a lot of trouble. In my mind he is the world's most dangerous man - even Hitler only wanted to dominate Europe; this Bush wants to take on the whole world.

I came to this country in 1956 as a political refugee after the Hungarian revolution, and I've never felt the world situation was as dangerous as it is now. And that should be a warning to everybody.

Shamil Khan, 36, London
I had no choice but to come today because George Bush is simply the biggest terrorist in the world. Terror is about making people terrified, and raining bombs down on civilian populations - women and children - certainly achieves that.

George Bush has used terrible violence on innocent people in Iraq and Afghanistan. Just because these people happen to be Muslims or foreigners, or whatever, does not make it any less painful for them.

This is still terror, and Bush and Blair will have that on their consciences forever.

Sister Monica Williams, 62, Derby
I am unhappy about US actions in the world, I am unhappy about going to war and attacking civilians.

Ultimately, I am a person who believes things can be resolved without violence. I think that solutions largely come from within, from within a country or from within an individual - look at what happened with Nelson Mandela in South Africa. I think it's very important that people are given the chance and the support to solve their own problems.

I am very unhappy with Tony Blair, because I don't think he is always being honest about his motives. He was in a position to be a bridge between nations and he missed that opportunity - with dire consequences. I hope it's not too late to realise the mistakes they are making.

You can see today the strength of feeling, with the huge mix of background, ages, and religion that have come along to demonstrate their opposition. There are people from all walks of life, and that shows us that people are basically good and sensible.

Kath Fernand, 50, Essex
It's the devastation and misery in the Middle East that forced me to come today.

This has been caused by the man who is now an honoured guest in this country. Bush and his cronies in the multinationals are ravaging the region for profit. In my mind Bush is just a figurehead for his friends in big business, and this is all about the dollar.

There were no weapons of mass destruction, and human rights abuses are occurring in many countries around the world; so why did we go into Iraq?

© Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003

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