Center For Constitutional Rights: Despite New FISA Law, CCR’s Challenge To NSA Domestic Surveillance Program To Be Heard In Federal Court In San Francisco

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
AUGUST 7, 2007
3:18 PM

CONTACT: Center For Constitutional Rights 
David Lerner, Riptide Communications, 212.260.5000 dlerner@riptideonline.com

 
Despite New FISA Law, CCR’s Challenge To NSA Domestic Surveillance Program To Be Heard In Federal Court In San Francisco
 

CALIFORNIA - AUGUST 7 - On Thursday, August 9, in a hearing before Federal District Judge Vaughn R. Walker, attorneys from the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) will argue that the NSA’s program of warrantless surveillance is unconstitutional and should be struck down. The argument in CCR v. Bush comes days after the Congress passed the Protect America Act of 2007 which broadly expands the Government’s power to spy on Americans without getting court approval.

CCR v. Bush was originally filed in federal court in New York but subsequently moved to San Francisco where other challenges related to the program are being litigated.

According to attorneys, there are substantial questions about whether the new law, which is temporary and due to expire in six months, is constitutional. The administration has continued to claim that the NSA program was always legal and that they have the inherent right to resume such surveillance at any time regardless of what the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) says, so, say attorneys, CCR’s case is in no way rendered moot.

WHAT: Oral Argument in CCR v. Bush

WHEN: Thursday, August 9 at 2:00 pm

WHERE: Courtroom 6, 17th Floor United States District Court, Northern District of California, 450 Golden Gate Avenue.

WHO: Arguing for Plaintiffs, CCR attorney Shayana Kadidal and CCR-cooperating attorney Professor Michael Avery of the National Lawyers Guild.

About CCR

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) is a non-profit legal and educational organization dedicated to protecting and advancing the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Founded in 1966 by attorneys who represented civil rights movements in the South, CCR is committed to the creative use of law as a positive force for social change.

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