Robert Jensen

Robert Jensen is a journalism professor at the University of Texas at Austin and board member of the Third Coast Activist Resource Center in Austin. He is the author of Arguing for Our Lives: A User’s Guide to Constructive Dialogue (City Lights, 2013); All My Bones Shake: Seeking a Progressive Path to the Prophetic Voice, (Soft Skull Press, 2009); Getting Off: Pornography and the End of Masculinity;  The Heart of Whiteness: Race, Racism, and White Privilege; Citizens of the Empire: The Struggle to Claim Our Humanity; and Writing Dissent: Taking Radical Ideas from the Margins to the Mainstream (Peter Lang). Jensen is also co-producer of the documentary film “Abe Osheroff: One Foot in the Grave, the Other Still Dancing” (Media Education Foundation, 2009), which chronicles the life and philosophy of the longtime radical activist.  An extended interview Jensen conducted with Osheroff is available here.

He can be reached at rjensen@uts.cc.utexas.edu and his articles can be found online here.

Articles by this author

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Sunday, August 24, 2014 - 9:30am
New University of Texas Chancellor's Military Background Is Cause for Reflection
By all accounts, the University of Texas System’s incoming chancellor, Admiral William McRaven, is a smart, thoughtful fellow with a sense of humor who knows how to listen — all important qualities for a leader. My new boss sounds like a pretty nice guy, for someone who has been involved in a long-...
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Barren field (Flickr / Jonathan Grado) Views
Saturday, June 14, 2014 - 9:15am
After the Harvest — Learning to Leave the Planet Gracefully
Every time I read the latest bad-and-getting-worse news about the health of the ecosphere, such as last month’s report that the melting of some giant glaciers had passed the point of no return, I think back to a conversation 25 years ago that helps me put such news in perspective. In a Minneapolis...
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Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 2:16pm
The Ideology Problem: A Failed Technocratic Deam for Journalism
Thomas Patterson’s new book on the current crises in journalism is organized around six specific problems, starting with “The Information Problem” and moving through Source, Knowledge, Education, Audience, and Democracy problems.
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Saturday, August 31, 2013 - 11:40am
Our Democracy?
An edited version of a presentation on the panel “Our Democracy in Crisis: The Rise of the Total Surveillance State and the War on a Free Press” organized by Chicago Area Peace Action at North Park University, Chicago, Thursday, August 29, 2013.
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Saturday, July 27, 2013 - 8:52am
Peace Talks: A New Chapter in An Old Book
New negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians may begin next week, with much talk of a “new chapter” in the seemingly intractable conflict. A new chapter, perhaps, but who is writing the book?
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Monday, June 24, 2013 - 2:36pm
Terror v. Surveillance? Keeping Americans Safe in Two Simple Steps
In the frenzy over Edward Snowden’s leak of classified information about government data-mining surveillance, public officials and pundits have tried to lock us into a narrowly defined and diversionary discussion that ignores the most important question we face about terrorism. Their argument goes something like this: No one wants to die in a terrorist attack. This kind of spying is necessary to prevent terrorist attacks. So, stop whining about how information is being collected, used, and potentially misused—it’s better than dying.
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Sunday, May 26, 2013 - 10:07am
Get Apocalyptic: Why Radical is the New Normal
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Friday, January 18, 2013 - 12:43pm
Torture Is Trivial
The great American torture debate has been rekindled by the nationwide release of “Zero Dark Thirty,” the hot new movie about the CIA’s hunt for Osama bin Laden.
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Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 11:45am
Hope is for the Lazy: The Challenge of Our Dead World
The following is an edited version of a sermon delivered July 8, 2012, at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Austin, TX: In 2005, I preached on the ecological crisis in a sermon I titled “ Hope is for the Weak: The Challenge of a Broken World .” Looking back, I realize that I had been far too upbeat and optimistic, probably trying too hard to be liked. Today I want to correct that.
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Friday, May 18, 2012 - 11:53am
The Case for a Morality of Radical Caution
Though my politics are radical, my approach to vexing moral questions is cautious; I try to be aware not only of my limits but of human limits to understand ourselves in a complex world. That’s why I call myself a radically cautious vegetarian. Here’s how it worked out:
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