Michael Schwalbe

Michael Schwalbe is a professor of sociology at North Carolina State University. He is the author of: Rigging the Game: How Inequality Is Reproduced in Everyday Life (Oxford, 2008). He can be reached at MLSchwalbe@nc.rr.com.

Articles by this author

Views
Tuesday, January 6, 2004 - 12:00pm
The Sport of Empire
Last summer my twelve-year-old nephew excitedly told me that he was finally going to get to play real football. That meant being on a school team, wearing a uniform, pads, and a helmet, and tackling. He was excited not only by the prospect of playing the game but by entering a standard rite of American manhood. I couldn't echo his enthusiasm. Nor could I bring myself to try to explain what was wrong with football. All I could do was to remark on how fast he was growing up.
Read more
Views
Sunday, November 2, 2003 - 12:11pm
Worker Rights Must Be Trade Policy Bottom Line
How long have you and your dad been selling furniture at the flea market? "About a year," the young man said. "Since the mill closed." He told me that his father had lost his job after twenty years as a textile dye supervisor. "It's the Asians," he said, his voice taking on an edge. "They make their stuff so cheap that they're putting American companies out of business. We just can't compete."
Read more
Views
Monday, May 5, 2003 - 1:13pm
Lessons in Death, Born in the USA
Young American men are the most violent group in the industrialized world. In 1992, after the first Gulf War, the homicide rate for American men between 15 and 24 was 37.2 per 100,000. That's ten times higher than the next country on the list, Italy, and 60 times higher than England. Homicide is now the second leading cause of death among young American men. Why do they kill so often? The comparison to European countries suggests that part of the answer has to do with lax gun control. Easy access to guns in this country ensures that violence will more often be deadly.
Read more
Views
Sunday, October 21, 2001 - 12:49pm
Professing Hard Truths
The enforcers of conformity who have criticized professors for daring to link the events of Sept. 11 to U.S. foreign policy would be wise to consider the case of Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick, a professor of chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill during an earlier time of national trouble. Hedrick published a letter to the editor in which he expressed views that his fellow Southerners found "incompatible with our honor and safety as a people." He was denounced as a traitor and corrupter of youth, burned in effigy, and fired by the UNC board of trustees.
Read more

Pages