Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan is the author, most recently, of Food Rules: An Eater's Manual. His previous book, a New York Times best-seller, was  In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto. His book, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006), was named one of the ten best books of 2006 by the New York Times and the Washington Post. He is also the author of The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World (2001); A Place of My Own (1997); and Second Nature (1991). A contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, Pollan is the recipient of numerous journalistic awards, including the James Beard Award for best magazine series in 2003 and the Reuters-I.U.C.N. 2000 Global Award for Environmental Journalism. Pollan served for many years as executive editor of Harper's Magazine and is now the Knight Professor of Science and Environmental Journalism at UC Berkeley.

 

Articles by this author

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Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 5:06pm
Why California’s Proposition 37 Should Matter to Anyone Who Cares About Food
One of the more interesting things we will learn on Nov. 6 is whether or not there is a “food movement” in America worthy of the name — that is, an organized force in our politics capable of demanding change in the food system. People like me throw the term around loosely, partly because we sense the gathering of such a force, and partly (to be honest) to help wish it into being by sheer dint of repetition. Clearly there is growing sentiment in favor of reforming American agriculture and interest in questions about where our food comes from and how it was produced.
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Monday, January 4, 2010 - 10:53am
Food Rules: A Completely Different Way To Fix The Health Care Crisis
The idea for this book came from a doctor--a couple of them, as a matter of fact.
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Thursday, September 10, 2009 - 7:27am
Big Food vs. Big Insurance
To listen to President Obama's speech on Wednesday night, or to just about anyone else in the health care debate, you would think that the biggest problem with health care in America is the system itself - perverse incentives, inefficiencies, unnecessary tests and procedures, lack of competition, and greed.
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Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 3:59pm
A Food Revolution in the Making from Victory Gardens to White House Lawn
Last month, First Lady Michelle Obama broke ground for a new vegetable garden on the South lawn of the White House. It's the first time food will be grown at the President's residence since Eleanor Roosevelt planted her Victory Garden during World War II. Back then, as part of the war effort, the government rationed many foods and the shortage of labor and transportation fuel made it difficult for farmers to harvest and deliver fruits and vegetables to market.
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Friday, October 10, 2008 - 11:10am
Farmer in Chief
Dear Mr. President-Elect,
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Monday, December 17, 2007 - 3:47pm
Our Decrepit Food Factories
The word "sustainability" has gotten such a workout lately that the whole concept is in danger of floating away on a sea of inoffensiveness. Everybody, it seems, is for it whatever "it" means. On a recent visit to a land-grant university's spanking-new sustainability institute, I asked my host how many of the school's faculty members were involved. She beamed: When letters went out asking who on campus was doing research that might fit under that rubric, virtually everyone replied in the affirmative. What a nice surprise, she suggested.
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Sunday, November 4, 2007 - 3:26pm
Weed It and Reap
For Americans who have been looking to Congress to reform the food system, these past few weeks have been, well, the best of times and the worst of times. A new politics has sprouted up around the farm bill, traditionally a parochial piece of legislation thrashed out in private between the various agricultural interests (wheat growers versus corn growers; meatpackers versus ranchers) without a whole lot of input or attention from mere eaters.
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Friday, April 23, 2004 - 5:27pm
A Flood of U.S. Corn Rips at Mexico
Americans have been talking a lot about trade this campaign season, about globalism's winners and losers, and especially about the export of American jobs. Yet even when globalism is working the way it's supposed - when Americans are exporting things like crops rather than jobs - there can be a steep social and environmental cost.
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Friday, July 19, 2002 - 5:30pm
When a Crop Becomes King
CORNWALL BRIDGE, Conn. — Here in southern New England the corn is already waist high and growing so avidly you can almost hear the creak of stalk and leaf as the plants stretch toward the sun. The ears of sweet corn are just starting to show up on local farm stands, inaugurating one of the ceremonies of an American summer. These days the nation's nearly 80 million-acre field of corn rolls across the countryside like a second great lawn, but this wholesome, all-American image obscures a decidedly more dubious reality.
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Sunday, June 3, 2001 - 5:21pm
The Organic-Industrial Complex
Almost overnight, the amount and variety of organic food on offer in my local supermarket has mushroomed. Fresh produce, milk, eggs, cereal, frozen food, even junk food — all of it now has its own organic doppelganger, and more often than not these products wind up in my shopping cart.
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