Matias Ramos

Matias Ramos is the 2011 Carol Jean and Edward F. Newman Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies. He works in the Institute's communications department, identifying and maximizing opportunities to build online audiences. Prior to joining IPS, Matias had fellowships at the UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education and the National Immigration Law Center. In addition, he is a co-founder of United We Dream, a national immigrant youth advocacy network. He studied Political Science at UCLA, where he was involved in the publication of "Underground Undergrads: UCLA Undocumented Immigrant Students Speak Out."

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 8:22am
MIA: Obama's New Common-Sense Immigration Policy
Now that the electronic shackle is off, it's really nice not having to listen to the eerie computer-voice commands regularly broadcast from its plastic speaker.
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Monday, August 15, 2011 - 8:28am
Diplomas vs. Deportation
When a group of undocumented young people took the stage at an immigration reform rally outside the White House in late July, they had a catchy chant: "Hey, Obama, don't deport my mama!" High school students dominated the crowd, which included protesters wearing shirts emblazoned with the words "I am the Maryland DREAM Act."
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Friday, July 8, 2011 - 1:10pm
Fukushima Aftermath: New U.S. Senate Proposal For Spent Fuel Storage
The effects of radiation released from the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant continue to be felt, as the U.S. Congress is readying proposals to deal with the storage of spent nuclear fuel in this side of the world. Back in March, when news broke that the Fukushima nuclear plant had been hit by the earthquake and tsunami catastrophe , IPS senior scholar Robert Alvarez predicted that the effects of radiation would be episodic and occur over time. Now those episodes are presenting themselves, according to Sandhya Jain at the Daily Pioneer:
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Friday, March 25, 2011 - 12:40pm
How to Avoid Our Own Fukushima
In an article for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists in 2002, Institute for Policy Studies senior scholar Robert Alvarez wrote, "several events could cause a loss of pool water, including leakage, evaporation, siphoning, pumping, aircraft impact, earthquake, accidental or deliberate drop of a fuel transport cask, reactor failure, or an explosion inside or outside the pool building." The recent loss of pool water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex and subse
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