Mark M. Jaycox

Mark M. Jaycox is a Policy Analyst and Legislative Assistant for EFF.

Articles by this author

Views
Tuesday, January 7, 2014 - 4:15pm
Three Hearings, Nine Hours, and One Accurate Statement: Why Congress Must Begin a Full Investigation into NSA Spying
Last week, press reports revealed more about the National Security Agency's (NSA) elite hacking unit, the Office of Tailored Access Operations (TAO).
Read more
Views
Friday, August 16, 2013 - 8:50am
NSA Spying: The Three Pillars of Government Trust Have Fallen
With each recent revelation about the NSA's spying programs government officials have tried to reassure the American people that all three branches of government—the Executive branch, the Judiciary branch, and the Congress—knowingly approved these programs and exercised rigorous oversight over them.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 7:50am
Questions for Comey: Former Top DOJ Attorney Who Oversaw NSA Spying Under Bush is Nominated to Become Next FBI Director
Current Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Director Robert Mueller’s term is expiring (again), and the Senate Judiciary Committee will be holding a hearing to question the nominee to replace Mueller, James Comey .
Read more
Views
Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 1:31pm
CISPA, the Privacy-Invading Cybersecurity Spying Bill, is Back in Congress
It's official: The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act was reintroduced in the House of Representatives yesterday. CISPA is the contentious bill civil liberties advocates fought last year, which would provide a poorly-defined "cybersecurity" exception to existing privacy law. CISPA offers broad immunities to companies who choose to share data with government agencies (including the private communications of users) in the name of cybersecurity.
Read more
Views
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 8:37am
Congress Will Battle Over Internet Privacy in 2013
Last year, we saw more battles in Congress over Internet freedom than we have in many years as user protests stopped two dangerous bills, the censorship-oriented SOPA, and the privacy-invasive Cybersecurity Act of 2012. But Congress ended the year by ramming through a domestic spying bill and weakening the Video Privacy Protection Act.
Read more