Mark Hertsgaard

Mark Hertsgaard (markhertsgaard.com), a fellow of The Nation Institute and The Nation's environment correspondent, is the author of five books, which have been translated into sixteen languages. His next book, Living Through the Storm: How We Survive the Next 50 Years of Climate Change, is forthcoming from Houghton-Mifflin.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 11:52am
The Other Keystone XL: On the Growing Fight over Cove Point
DON'T BE A FRACKING GASHOLE.
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Wednesday, January 9, 2013 - 3:07pm
President Obama: Start the Climate Conversation Now
Dear Mr. President, You promised, days after you were re-elected, that you would lead a national conversation about climate change during your second term. Well, here’s your chance, sir. Yesterday your own administration’s scientists have announced that 2012 was the hottest year on record for the Lower 48 states. This disturbing news provides all the opening you need.
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Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 6:24am
Hurricane Sandy as Greek Tragedy
Never has a hurricane been more aptly, if tragically, named than Sandy, the superstorm that flooded New York City and battered much of the East Coast.
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Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 11:49am
10 Questions for Both Candidates on Energy and the Environment
Environmental issues often get short shrift in US presidential campaigns, and this year’s election has been no exception. In poll after poll, voters report that the economy is the decisive issue. But no economy, and no society, can function without what scientists call nature’s support services. To grow food we need healthy soil, fresh water and a stable climate. To sustain a productive work force, we need clean air and protection from pollution.
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Thursday, September 13, 2012 - 1:36pm
Harvesting a Climate Disaster
Farmers went to Washington yesterday. Members of a coalition representing more than 80 agricultural organizations rallied on Capitol Hill to demand passage of a new farm bill that has been stalled in Congress.
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Friday, July 27, 2012 - 3:47pm
Feel the Burn: Making the 2012 Heat Wave Matter
There have been two, maybe three, landmark heat waves in the history of man-made global warming. The first was in 1988. Then as now, the eastern two-thirds of the United States was broiling while relentless drought parched soil and withered crops across the Midwest.
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Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 12:26pm
Déjà Vu at Rio+20
The message couldn’t have been clearer. The activists were shot, execution style, on the same day in May 2011 that Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies passed a rewrite of the Forest Code, the law governing economic activity in the Amazon. Zé Cláudio Ribeiro da Silva and Maria do Espírito Santo, a married activist couple, were gunned down near their forest home in Pará, in northeastern Brazil.
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Friday, April 20, 2012 - 10:57am
Save Earth Day
Celebrated every April 22 for the past forty-two years, Earth Day is showing its (middle) age. Instead of rallying public pressure for far-reaching reforms, Earth Day is becoming, at least in the United States, a bland, tired ritual that polluters and politicians have learned to ignore or co-opt.
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Friday, November 18, 2011 - 10:21am
The Keystone Victory
Victories against climate change have been rare, so it’s vital to recognize them when they happen. The Obama administration’s decision to delay the Keystone XL pipeline is one such victory—arguably the most important achievement in the climate fight in North America in years.
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Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:39pm
Obama Loves Nukes
Grant this much to President Obama: he does not pander to mass opinion. In his first year in office, he stood with Wall Street even after its reckless greed produced an economic collapse that left most Americans calling for bankers’ heads. Now, even as the Fukushima power station threatens to unleash the greatest nuclear catastrophe since Chernobyl, Obama continues to champion an expansion of nuclear power in the United States.
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