Jillian C. York

Jillian C. York is the Electronic Frontier Foundation's director for International Freedom of Expression.

Articles by this author

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Monday, January 12, 2015 - 4:15pm
More Surveillance Won't Protect Free Speech
Following a terrorist attack, it is not uncommon to hear calls from politicians and government officials for increased surveillance. Fear and grief can lead to quick “solutions” that have significant consequences; as we pointed out last week, some of the most far-reaching surveillance and law...
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Friday, January 9, 2015 - 7:45am
In Wake of Charlie Hebdo Attack, Let’s Not Sacrifice Even More Rights
EFF is stunned and deeply saddened by the attack on Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical newspaper. As free speech advocates, we mourn the use of violence against individuals who used creativity and free expression to engage in cultural and political criticism. Murder is the ultimate form of...
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Saturday, December 27, 2014 - 2:45pm
The State of Free Expression Online: 2014 in Review
In the midst of the global surveillance debate, talk of online censorship has often taken a backseat. Yet, all around the world, the inalienable right to freedom of expression is violated on a regular basis. While in 2014, issues such as terrorism and online harassment generated new discussions of...
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Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 8:20am
Some Things Never Change: Governments Still Present Biggest Threat to Open Internet
Some things change, but others stay the same. While the types of threats facing Internet users worldwide have diversified over the past few years, from targeted malware to distributed denial of service attacks , one thing has remained constant: governments seeking to exert control over their populations still remain the biggest threat to the open Internet. Corporate Compliance
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Tuesday, March 6, 2012 - 11:38am
Surveillance Inc: How Western Tech Firms Are Helping Arab Dictators
Reliance means vulnerability, and the activists and citizen journalists of the Arab uprisings rely heavily on the Internet and mobile technology. They use text messaging to coordinate protests, for example, or social media sites to upload the photos and videos that then make it into mainstream global media.
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