Frances Moore Lappé

Frances Moore Lappé is the author of EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think to Create the World We Want (Nation Books) and 17 other books including the acclaimed Diet for a Small Planet.  She is also a YES! contributing editor.

Articles by this author

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Friday, August 25, 2006 - 6:01pm
A Right to Food?
"If someone can't afford to buy food, they're still a citizen and we're still responsible to them," city official Adriana Aranha in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, told me in 2000. What a concept--and one that had helped her to lift her Workers' Party to victory in municipal elections seven years earlier.
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Thursday, October 14, 2004 - 5:52pm
The Genius of Wangari Maathai
Several prominent Norwegians have questioned the Nobel Committee for awarding the Nobel Peace Prize to Wangari Maathai. Why honor environmental activism in an era when war, terrorism and nuclear proliferation are even more urgent problems? What they miss is Dr. Maathai's special genius.
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Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 5:49pm
A Better Way to Feed the Hungry
Bill Gates thinks he's got a brilliant idea: fighting malnutrition abroad by fortifying food. The scheme, backed with $50 million from the Gates Foundation, in part encourages Proctor & Gamble, Philip Morris' Kraft, and other companies to develop vitamin and iron-fortified processed foods. It then facilitates their entry into Third World markets.
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Thursday, April 18, 2002 - 5:48pm
Dispel the Myth That Cheap Food Comes Without High Costs
Earth Day is a perfect time to celebrate the first, true gift of the Earth to us: food. Before we toss our hats into the air, though, we might want to start with an admission. While we in the United States like to think we're blessed with the world's best and cheapest food, we've actually let market prices lie to us.
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Wednesday, June 27, 2001 - 6:09pm
People, Not Technology, Are the Key to Ending Hunger
Biotechnology companies and even some scientists argue that we need genetically modified seeds to feed the world and to protect the Earth from chemicals. Their arguments feel eerily familiar. Thirty years ago, I wrote "Diet for a Small Planet" for one reason. As a researcher buried in the UC Berkeley agricultural library, I was stunned to learn that the experts -- equivalent to the biotech proponents of today -- were wrong. They were telling us we'd reached the Earth's limits to feed ourselves, but in fact there was more than enough food for us all.
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