Ellen Brown

Ellen Brown is an attorney and founder of the Public Banking Institute. She is the author of twelve books, including the best-selling Web of Debt, and her latest book, The Public Bank Solution, which explores successful public banking models historically and globally.

Articles by this author

Views
Monday, August 5, 2013 - 1:49pm
The Detroit 'Bail-In' Template: Fleecing Pensioners to Save the Banks
The Detroit bankruptcy is looking suspiciously like the bail-in template originated by the G20’s Financial Stability Board in 2011, which exploded on the scene in Cyprus in 2013 and is now becoming the model globally.
Read more
Views
Thursday, March 28, 2013 - 12:13pm
Think Cyprus Confiscation Scheme Can't Happen Here? Think Again
Confiscating the customer deposits in Cyprus banks, it seems, was not a one-off, desperate idea of a few Eurozone “troika” officials scrambling to salvage their balance sheets.
Read more
Views
Friday, March 22, 2013 - 12:22pm
A Safe and a Shotgun or Publicly-owned Banks? The Battle of Cyprus
If these worries become really serious, . . . [s]mall savers will take their money out of banks and resort to household safes and a shotgun. – Martin Hutchinson on the attempted EU raid on deposits in Cyprus banks
Read more
Views
Thursday, March 7, 2013 - 12:01pm
Quantitative Easing for the People: Default on the Public Debt, Nationalize the Banks, and a Dividend for Citizens
Comedian Beppe Grillo was surprised himself when his Five Star Movement got 8.7 million votes in the Italian general election of February 24-25th. His movement is now the biggest single party in the chamber of deputies, says The Guardian, which makes him “a kingmaker in a hung parliament.”
Read more
Views
Monday, February 25, 2013 - 8:03am
How the Fed Could Fix the Economy—and Why It Hasn’t
Quantitative easing (QE) is supposed to stimulate the economy by adding money to the money supply, increasing demand. But so far, it hasn’t been working. Why not? Because as practiced for the last two decades, QE does not actually increase the circulating money supply. It merely cleans up the toxic balance sheets of banks. A real “helicopter drop” that puts money into the pockets of consumers and businesses has not yet been tried. Why not? Another good question . .
Read more
Views
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 1:56pm
How Congress Could Fix Its Budget Woes, Permanently
As Congress struggles through one budget crisis after another, it is becoming increasingly evident that austerity doesn't work. We cannot possibly pay off a $16 trillion debt by tightening our belts, slashing public services, and raising taxes. Historically, when the deficit has been reduced , the money supply has been reduced along with it, throwing the economy into recession.
Read more
Views
Friday, January 18, 2013 - 7:00am
The Trillion Dollar Coin: A Debt Solution for the People
On Friday, January 11, economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman urged the White House to mint a platinum coin worth $1 trillion, as a counter to what was then a threat to block federal spending that Congress had already approved.
Read more
Views
Friday, January 4, 2013 - 2:49pm
Political Football Over Disaster Relief: Another Argument for Public Banking
In a shameless display of putting politics before human needs, Congress began 2013 still scrapping over a $60 billion Hurricane Sandy relief bill fully nine weeks after the disaster hit.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, December 19, 2012 - 1:53pm
Fiscal Cliff: Let's Call Their Bluff
The “fiscal cliff” has all the earmarks of a false flag operation, full of sound and fury, intended to extort concessions from opponents.
Read more
Views
Thursday, November 8, 2012 - 2:26pm
It’s the Interest, Stupid! Why Bankers Rule the World
In the 2012 edition of Occupy Money released last week, Professor Margrit Kennedy writes that a stunning 35% to 40% of everything we buy goes to interest. This interest goes to bankers, financiers, and bondholders, who take a 35% to 40% cut of our GDP. That helps explain how wealth is systematically transferred from Main Street to Wall Street.
Read more

Pages